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Reichskanzlei tapestries

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    These tapestries have been known for being in use within the Reichskanzlei for a looong time!!

    The people who do not realize that should at least be simply quiet.
    Every day is a good day on WAF.

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      "Hello, tapestry, are you insulted by being called a banner?"

      Comment


        This I found online, Captain Graubart's obituary.


        Birth: Dec. 8, 1901
        Albany
        Albany County
        New York, USA
        Death: Aug. 12, 2003
        Palm Beach
        Palm Beach County
        Florida, USA

        US Navy Captain. Graubart graduated from Charleston Harris High School in New York City in 1918 and later graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1925. His first assignment was onboard the Light Cruiser, U.S.S. Cincinnati which in 1927 was involved in the Nicaragua "Banana Fleet" operations to protect American refugees during the country's civil war. In 1927 Graubart reported to the Officers Submarine School in New London, Connecticut and upon completion was transferred to the Submarine U.S.S. R-2 where he served until 1931. In 1932 Graubart was assigned to the Submarine U.S.S. Barracuda for a three year tour of duty followed by duty on the Submarine U.S.S. Porpoise where he served from 1938 to 1940. Graubart, fluent in German, became a diesel engineering specialist and was transferred to Germany where he studied at the Technical University in Dresden. While in Berlin in June 1940 he was appointed assistant Naval Attaché, and was there when Germany declared war on the United States. On December 11, 1941, he was arrested by the Gestago and held at Bad Nauheim prison. In mid 1942 he returned home in an exchange of political prisoners. His next assignment was Commander of the Submarine Base in New Guinea, supporting America's Pacific campaign. After the war ended he returned to Germany in May 1945, being the first naval officer into the city at the end of the war. At a meeting with Soviet units in the Reich Chancellery he famously got the Russian guards drunk on vodka, and in the confusion of inebriety he was able to make off with the large swastika banner that had been the backdrop of many of Hitler's speeches. The banner now hangs in the Naval Academy museum. Graubart subsequently represented the United States Navy at the surrender of the Kriegsmarine (German Navy) at Flensburg. In the distribution of the few remaining German naval vessels after the Potsdam conference, the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen which had been in company with the Bismarck when she sank the Hood, and had herself landed three hits with her 8 inch shells on the Prince of Wales in that actions-was assigned to the US Navy. With a crew of 900 German officers and crewmen, Graubart brought the Prinz Eugen across the Atlantic to Boston. Prinz Eugen was later a guinea pig in Operation Crossroads, the Bikini Atoll atomic tests conducted against ships in 1946. A short time later Graubart was appointed Chief of Naval Intelligence in Berlin, where he remained for two years. In 1951 he returned to command the amphibious force flagship U.S.S. Taconic and stayed in that command until 1952. The following year he returned to Germany attached to the CIA in Bonn and Franfurt. His final post, also in intelligence was at the Third Naval District in New York. Graubart retired from the Navy in 1955 and returned to Germany as an engineering consultant.

        Family links:
        Spouse:
        Lucile Cheever Graubart (1901 - 1995)*

        *Calculated relationship

        Burial:
        United States Naval Academy Cemetery
        Annapolis
        Anne Arundel County
        Maryland, USA
        Last edited by John R.; 07-20-2014, 05:35 PM.

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          I have a signature from Captain Graubart, from his time in Prinz Eugen. I doubt if the tapestry is hanging in the small Naval Academy museum for many reasons, one, there is no room for a non-US Navy related article such as this to be displayed and two, I have never seen it there as best as I can remember and I have visited the museum often years gone by.

          When I say non-US Navy related, I mean that the tapestry has nothing to do with the US Navy at all except that Captain Graubart owned it once.

          Once, it might have been displayed, I do not think so now. It might though.

          It is probably in storage someplace at the museum, very unlikely that it would have been sold or lost.

          For those interested, I would recommend contacting the museum through their internet link with a couple images of what you are talking about and the reference to Captain Graubart, and see if they still have it.

          I think this is an important connection for those interested in research. I would think Captain Graubart told his family this story and he does not seem like a man that made many mistakes in his long life.

          If it is there, perhaps they would be good enough to send a photo of the article.

          He certainly seemed to have had no dislike of Germany, he returned there in 1955 to work as an engineer.

          John
          Last edited by John R.; 07-20-2014, 05:40 PM.

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            To elaborate a bit, I think a researcher by contacting the US Naval Academy museum might even help the current curator understand what it is that he has.

            I am sure there would be a written record of what Captain Graubart told them, and I note in the obituary it is stated that it is a backdrop. What does this mean? Was it a permanent wall hanging or portable wall hanging, hung for the occasion of a speech or something else?

            It certainly seems almost certain that this tapestry was in the Chancellery, not someplace else, and that Captain Graubart left with two of them giving one to his Chief Yeoman.

            If I was interested enough to post here, I would make the effort to contact the museum and see what their record states.

            My personal interest is in Captain Graubart, not the wall tapestry.

            John

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              Very interesting John. It seems the two competing trains of thought in this thread were both somewhat correct if these were backdrops. RK pieces but not displayed all the time on the walls explains why they do not appear in any period photos of the RK.
              Thanks for the clarification!
              Looking for a 30 '06 Chauchat magazine.

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                ....
                Last edited by Jeff V; 07-21-2014, 04:35 PM. Reason: duplicate post
                Looking for a 30 '06 Chauchat magazine.

                Comment


                  Well, to be clear, I am not saying I know what it was used for but I think since we have a photo of a similar tapestry hanging in front of a stage in one of the Reich Chancellery books (minus the gold leaves) it could be drop tapestry. In other words, the podium is sitting on the stage like in the photo with a similar but less ornate tapestry hanging from the stage itself.

                  Or it could have had its own hardware for a back drop or back drops.

                  Podium banners in that book reveal something far more flimsy and flag like than a tapestry, meaning hanging directly off the podium. Maybe OFW did not mean a tapestry would be hanging from a podium directly, but from the stage in front of and below the podium.

                  I personally think there is no doubt that the tapestry was part of the chancellery and I hope somebody goes to the US Naval Academy and inquires about the one they supposedly have.

                  The first hand evidence of Captain Graubart seals that for me.

                  John

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                    Appears that they may have been stored there for potential use but perhaps not actually used. Which should not affect their value that much based on their rarity.

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                      Just aquired

                      Just bought this one from an estate in the North East.

                      75 inches wide. (6 foot 3 inches)

                      80 inches tall. (6 foot 8 inch) DOES NOT include the bullion fringe.

                      Fringe in 4 inches long.

                      Cheers,
                      Howard
                      Attached Files

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                        Couple more photos.
                        Attached Files

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                          Dear friends,

                          I've just skimmed through all the entries on this thread over the past years and did not notice anyone referring to the symbolism of this banner or tapestry design itself...though I certainly don't claim to have read each and every word written here! The symbol of a swaz surrounded by oakleaves is, to my understanding, that of the Alterkämpferbund -- the League of Old Fighters -- and therefore it would have been featured as at least a podium drape at any event after 1933 that involved or centered upon that group of Old Fighters. As I understand it, the Alterkmpfers gathered at a variety of events over the years, including various ceremonial marches in the Gaue and at other levels, dinners, vacation-type trips, etc. Such banners as these would be present to symbolize the unique and exclusive group that these Old Fighters of the NSDAP represented.

                          I am not surprised that examples of the Alterkämpferbund logo in banner or tapestry format would have turned up at the Berlin Reichschancellery; they must have been stored there permanently to be on hand for such festive occasions; indeed, many different types of banners must have been stored somewhere in that huge building complex. But examples must also have been stored in Munich at the Brown House or at the Party Administration Building or elsewhere, for local use, and probably stored at other locations throughout Germany, too. It is also not surprising that examples of this banner/tapestry were not permanently displayed at the RK or at the Party Buildings in Munich, since they related to a particular organization within the NSDAP and would only have been appropriate for specific gatherings of that organization.

                          The examples most often seen here have the wide top piece that could have been used to affix the banner to a podium or other mounting.

                          Thanks for taking the time to consider my thoughts on this unique relic! Cheers, friends,

                          Br. James

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                            I finally found it. It is I would think the poorest condition one in a collection, but I love it anyway. I think it may have come from a museum due to the tag. daniel tarr817j
                            Attached Files

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                              Tag photo. This item appears to have been thru a war and lost! Never mind it did! d-t
                              Attached Files

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                                Originally posted by daniel tarr817j View Post
                                I finally found it. It is I would think the poorest condition one in a collection, but I love it anyway. I think it may have come from a museum due to the tag. daniel tarr817j
                                Very cool!

                                Nice to see the reverse design.

                                Cheers,
                                Howard

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