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    Recent addition

    Just wanted to share a recent addition I'm really happy with.
    Paul

    www.lakesidetrader.com

    sigpic

    #2
    It looks like a very nice example. Are my eyes deceiving me or is it a late one with an iron/magnetic pommel underneath plating? FP

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      #3
      Looks great!


      Regards, Wim
      Freedom is not for Free

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        #4
        Looks like it's been sitting in a vets footlocker since the war.

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          #5
          Right you are Fred.
          www.lakesidetrader.com

          sigpic

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            #6
            Is that an ivory grip? It should be, with a Damascus blade! Yummy!

            Br. James

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              #7
              Paul,have you checked the blade tang for makings? Very nicely conditioned iron based 1901 pattern officers dagger.
              Rick

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                #8
                Originally posted by stratocaster3 View Post
                Paul,have you checked the blade tang for makings? Very nicely conditioned iron based 1901 pattern officers dagger.
                Rick
                Why would you want to take apart a dagger with an ivory handle that has been untouched for 100+ years?
                Ralph.
                Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stm./Pz.Erz.Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

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                  #9
                  I agree, Ralph -- I would never take a dagger apart -- the damage that could be done in doing that could far exceed the value of any information achieved in the process. And if damaged, regardless of what was on the tang or the underside of the crossgurards, that could end the life of the piece.

                  Br. James

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                    #10
                    .

                    Beautiful!

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                      #11
                      fantastic!
                      Terry Keller
                      "ihr wollt doch auch das Blut vom Degen lecken"
                      Rammstein

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                        #12
                        Very nice Paul. Interesting to see it has had the hammered pattern put over the lightning bolt pattern. Hard to tell from pics but it looks like the scabbard has been shortened, which would be the reason to cover the cut off portion of the bolt pattern at the bottom of the scabbard with the hammered.

                        Best Russ.

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by rbminis View Post
                          Why would you want to take apart a dagger with an ivory handle that has been untouched for 100+ years?
                          Ralph.
                          Ralph, James;
                          I understand and appreciate your points. I have decades of experience with Imperial Navy edged weapons and a notable collection of them, all of which have ivory grips. I do understand the concern someone without considerable experience might have in performing this procedure. In fact, without experience I would suggest seek assistance. However an experienced collector and dealer such as Paul can and probably has performed this without the slightest chance of damaging the dagger. I do appreciated that one may not want to check a blade tang if it indeed it clearly has never been apart, has a set in place portepee, even patina etc. These are actually hard to come by these days as most daggers have gone through many hands. I actually have one like that and will not ever disassemble it.

                          Yes, one has to be smart about the condition of the piece and its ability to be disassembled and the relative value of the information to be possibly gained. Providing the pommel isn't pinned, the tang is not rusted to the pommel, the blade tang is not corroded and splitting the ivory etc. all have bearing on if it is something wise to attempt. One simply unscrews the pommel with the with a light touch of the gloved fingers. If you must use any pressure at all then the answer is simple. Stop. Do not use any force. The grip will slide up over the tang if there is no corrosion. Again, if the slightest force is necessary then stop. Yes it must be performed gently and with great care.

                          Ivory is not as fragile as you might think. I have yet to observe an ivory dagger grip that did not retain its integrity even after 100 years unless it was damaged by impact or if a blade tang has rusted, putting pressure on the grip from the inside and compromising its structural integrity. Im not talking about age cracks but structural cracks. What is your experience in this regard? I haven't had any problems.

                          As to information to be gleaned specifically in the case of Pauls dagger, I was referring to the possibility of a damascus smiths signature mark on the blade tang which can add interest and value to the dagger. I assumed he may have checked if he thought it appropriate.


                          BTW, how does one know if the dagger pommel and grip has not been removed in the last 100+ years?


                          Rick

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                            #14
                            Thanks for your good response, Rick, and I do respect your experience in carefully dis-assembling daggers without incident. In response to your question: "What is your experience in this regard?", my answer is simple -- I have no experience whatsoever, as I have never tried to take a dagger apart. All I have to do is view countless photos here on WAF and elsewhere of the results of people taking a piece apart and then trying to put it back together again -- seemingly innocent, but when one sees the scratches to the tang nut and elsewhere on the piece, the cracks and chips to the grip material caused by stress in improperly refitting the sections together, crossguards out of line and/or mounted backwards, etc., the results speak for themselves -- IMO, of course.

                            Br. James

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                              #15
                              Nice, Paul.

                              Too bad about the missing scabbard screw... that probably reduces the value significantly

                              John

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