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Funeral 2nd Luft?

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    Funeral 2nd Luft?

    Opinion on this new arrival will be appreciated. Is this a "Funeral Dagger"
    Thanks
    Attached Files

    #2
    It's a KLASS
    Attached Files

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      #3
      That's Klaas, not Klass.

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        #4
        "Klaassy" piece

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          #5
          Yes it is.
          Attached Files

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            #6
            That's a beautiful dagger and because of its seldom encountered black grip -that has lost its white paint- it is much more expensive than a common luftw. dagger. Personnaly I hate that term "Funeral" if you now the story.

            But again: This is a very gorgeous piece. Regards, Theo
            Freedom is not for Free

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              #7
              Any ideas on the ball park value of this type of dagger. Thanks

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                #8
                The last couple I've seen were in and around $1K, although I've seen them go higher depending on condition.

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                  #9
                  I don’t think it’s lost it’s white paint it was always black . Rob
                  God please take justin bieber and gave us dio back

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                    #10
                    Something I've seen with some other specimens, the twisting damage to the grip wire where it goes right next to the pommel could have been from where and when the dagger was taken apart to polish the grip after removing the paint. FP

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                      #11
                      Are not white on black grips rare in the first place, why would you clean the white off to produce a black grip that collectors automatically assume was a white grip. To me it would appear Klass made black grip daggers for some unknown reason. I can only think Black equals death so some sort of funeral piece like a widows Iron Cross presented to the next of kin I don't know but for sure they are not all cleaned white grip daggers imo, especially the Army Klass with the longer grip that must have a purpose some sort of meaning ( not Railway related). Rob
                      God please take justin bieber and gave us dio back

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by ROBB View Post
                        Are not white on black grips rare in the first place, why would you clean the white off to produce a black grip that collectors automatically assume was a white grip. To me it would appear Klass made black grip daggers for some unknown reason. I can only think Black equals death so some sort of funeral piece like a widows Iron Cross presented to the next of kin I don't know but for sure they are not all cleaned white grip daggers imo, especially the Army Klass with the longer grip that must have a purpose some sort of meaning ( not Railway related). Rob
                        Something that has been discussed for years sometimes at great length on different forums - some of high points were: 1) no period regulations for black colored grips 2) no period documentation of any kind for black colored grips 3) no period photos of black colored grips. 4) early manufactured daggers of both types by Klaas having the phenolic white colored plastic grips (that are known to change colors). So the simplest explanation that does have some supporting evidence may be that the company or companies that made the cast phenolic resins had to stop making them due to more and more resources being taken over by the Wehrmacht for the war effort. Solingen makers then having to use substitutes like wood and plaster for grip cores, milk based plastic resins etc. But Klaas for a while was able to use the solid black type plastics (that were possibly industrial surplus or not up to milspec standards) in quantities too small for general use because they were still being used for the Wehrmacht. But that dried up as well early in 1942, forcing some Solingen bayonet makers to go back to wood like they did in the prewar period. That also changing as the reddish colored plastic resins came into use. But not universally as some Solingen makers used both the wood and reddish plastic types of grips, and by others for various other items for the Wehrmacht. FP

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