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Tank batteries and throat mic.

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    Tank batteries and throat mic.

    Hi.
    Not my field of collecting.
    These were said to be from a tank. Is it true?
    I recognize only pz. throat mic.
    Can anyone tell the price range for them as well?

    Kind regards
    K.
    Attached Files
    Always interested in pre WWII Estonian Army Clothing, Insignias and equipment!

    #2
    ...
    Attached Files
    Always interested in pre WWII Estonian Army Clothing, Insignias and equipment!

    Comment


      #3
      Hello,

      1) the throat mike is a Kmf.b used in panzer and other armored vehicles. Price around 150 euros.
      2) the 12NC26 Nickel-Cadmium battery is used in a wide range of communication applications. It is not a vehicle battery. No idea on the price.
      3) I do not know the other one, but surely not a panzer battery. These were not fitted in a wooden frame.

      Hope this helps.
      _______________________________________________

      Always looking for german WWII Infrared devices and Ausblickkopf for Trblf3

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Dufleuve View Post
        Hello,

        1) the throat mike is a Kmf.b used in panzer and other armored vehicles. Price around 150 euros.
        2) the 12NC26 Nickel-Cadmium battery is used in a wide range of communication applications. It is not a vehicle battery. No idea on the price.
        3) I do not know the other one, but surely not a panzer battery. These were not fitted in a wooden frame.

        Hope this helps.
        Yes, thank you!
        Always interested in pre WWII Estonian Army Clothing, Insignias and equipment!

        Comment


          #5
          I am new here but I was looking at your throat mic and noticed that it had three prongs: I believe that the three prongs were used after May of 43 before that the throat mic had two prongs

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Lauren View Post
            I am new here but I was looking at your throat mic and noticed that it had three prongs: I believe that the three prongs were used after May of 43 before that the throat mic had two prongs
            It depended on what member of the crew you were.
            Ralph.
            Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stm./Pz.Erz.Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Lauren View Post
              I am new here but I was looking at your throat mic and noticed that it had three prongs: I believe that the three prongs were used after May of 43 before that the throat mic had two prongs
              The throat microphone Kmf.a has a two prong plug while the Kmf.b has a three prong plug. In the Kmf.a the switchbox just switches the microphone on and off, while in the Kmf.b it switches a separate contact (the same distinction exists with the Hmf.a and b hand microphones). This is why the Kmf.b was typically used with tranceivers so that the microphone switch could switch between reception and sending. In tanks this switching capability was used to switch between the tanks' intercom and transmitter; that is why only the radio operator and commander used the microphones with the three prong plug. The driver and loader could only use the intercom, so they were provided with the two prong Kmf.a.

              regards,

              FS

              Comment


                #8
                From the manuals I've seen, German armor used varta made batteries with housings made of a dark rubber/bakelite material. They had a very similar construction to the batteries everyone else was using in the 1930s and 1940s for auto's, such as exide and delco.

                These look like stationary radio batteries, A lot of early radios used batteries and were not powered from the local supply.

                Now, that is not to say that in the last days of the war someone didn't attempt to crank a vehicle with one of theses. Push comes to shove and people will attempt about anything.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Fe 26 View Post
                  From the manuals I've seen, German armor used varta made batteries with housings made of a dark rubber/bakelite material. They had a very similar construction to the batteries everyone else was using in the 1930s and 1940s for auto's, such as exide and delco.

                  These look like stationary radio batteries, A lot of early radios used batteries and were not powered from the local supply.

                  Now, that is not to say that in the last days of the war someone didn't attempt to crank a vehicle with one of theses. Push comes to shove and people will attempt about anything.


                  Thank you all for the replies.
                  Always interested in pre WWII Estonian Army Clothing, Insignias and equipment!

                  Comment

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