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1929 Nurnberg Badge- Facts and Theories

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    1929 Nurnberg Badge- Facts and Theories

    1929 Nurnberg Portable Award

    What originally was first created as a commemorative tinnie of a German Party Day Rally in 1929 in Nuremberg, eventually evolved into 3rd officially recognized National NSDAP Badge behind Frontbann Nadel and Braunschweig SA Abzeichen (1933).

    When I say recognized nationally I mean being made into official NSDAP Ehrenzeichen and NOT in the way of events being commemorated actually taking place. (In which case the Coburg Abzeichen would of course be counted as first- 1922).

    Counting from the day those (ALL of NSDAP Ehrenzeichen that is) badges were actually made- 1929 Nurnberg Party Day Badge is the oldest one. It was not however officially recognized as a National Award of the NSDAP until much later- 1936. Hopefully that clears up some confusion about what the ranking is and according to what criteria.
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    #2
    2

    Below is what has been described by most collectors as a usual tinnie-like, Party Day awarded “run of the mill” example in bronze (3 classes exist-bronze, silver and gold) made by the firm of Hoffstatter of Bonn. Hollow stamped example with horizontal pin back, bearing the makers name on the roundel holding the pin. The above mentioned firm has been thought until very recently to be the sole supplier of the 1929 distributed pins.
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      #3
      3

      Below is another example of the hollow type made by Hoffstatter. Of note- horizontally bevelled roof line where it meets the brick work on the Ludwigstor (middle tower on top of the badge), three window left side tower, generally “higher” silhouette of the top city landscape as well as “open” E in Nurnberg. Usual pin attachment on the back
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        #4
        4

        Another variation of a badge produced by Hoffstatter. Obviously created by a different die featuring a different “square” G, unique tower missing most of top roof detail, downsized left side tower (two window openings only vs 3 on the previous- hollow type) and the “solid” back featuring vertical pin attachment.
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          #5
          5

          Another example of a solid backed pin in silver grade. Most of those pins with solid backs seem to be of the “silver” grade. Like previous example of the same- maker marked on the back. Fine example retaining most of its frosting.
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            #6
            6

            Another example to come from the workshops of Hoffstatter. This time RZM marked. If indeed made by the mentioned maker it could be considered 3rd type as it neither matches the hollow nor solid types mentioned before (details as mentioned before- lettering, towers, etc.).
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              #7
              7

              Another later version- RZM marked example (RZM over numeral 15). Similar (or same) attachment plate with horizontal pin. Of note-Hoffstatter’s RZM code was M1/15 (for NSDAP medals and insignia).
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                #8
                8

                Below are a couple of pages from Assmann sales catalog which clearly shows them as being one of the manufacturers of the 1929 Nurnberg badge. Of note is the fact that although the catalog clearly shows both it AND 1931 SA Braunschweig Treffen badges in their “Plaketten” section, it only mentions the 1931 Badge under their “NSDAP Abzeichen”. The latest DATED badge from that catalog is from 1935 (Tag Der Arbeit badge) that I could find so that would mean that the 1929 pin was not yet officially recognized as a national award of the Party..
                My apologies for weak pics of the catalog pages.
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                  #9
                  9

                  Below is a close-up of a badge from the Assmann Catalog. Courtesy of the membership here as are most other pictures used by me in this write-up. I hope the authors do not mind- if there are any objections let me know and I’ll pull them. Also my apologies as I do not have any photo sources (or names) listed but thanks to all who posted them.
                  Based on the close up from this catalog I believe those two are the badges that are made by Assmann in the times when this award was only recognized as a simple “plakette”. Here they are:
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                    #10
                    10

                    The characteristics that stand out IMO as to this piece to be made by Assmann are few- “closed” E starting to resemble numeral ‘8’, square G, Ludwigstor design that is different from any previously posted ones, and also look at the roof of the hut directly to the Main tower’s right side- it seem to have a slight curvature- bending downwards in the middle only to go back up overshadowing the tower to the right.
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                      #11
                      11

                      One more thing that I noticed on the “Assmann” made badges is a small flaw that seem to be present on most (if not all) badges of this variety. Pictures below:
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                        #12
                        12

                        Versos on the proposed “Assmann” badges:
                        Thanks for reading this far and please feel free to correct and add any more info on those elusive little pins.
                        cheers
                        Matt
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                          #13
                          13

                          Almost forgot- one of the original elements of the badge which according to some was the first pin- at least partially- designed by Hitler- Nurnberg’s Ludwigstor.
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                            #14
                            Great job Matthew.
                            This will be a reference thread for this badge with very usefull information about a very interesting and badly known badge
                            THis is the reason why I think the moderators must pin this thread.

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                              #15
                              I have to agree with Gregorio, a great job Matthew

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