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1940 Ypenburg /Hague Battle Fj

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    1940 Ypenburg /Hague Battle Fj

    I stumbled across this Dutch very detailled account on the battle of Ypenburg/the Hague. I only knew beforehand that this operation didn´t go very well, but reading it I was stunned about how wrong it almost went and the high amount of losses and POWs. It reads like a blueprint of the mistakes made in Crete again and somehow when planning the battle of Crete it seems that the lessons weren´t really learnt ( focus on the hoped surprise and throwing planes and men right into the enemy). I think it is interesting to read especially in such detail. It surely wasn´t that comforting being a Fj in these airborne operations.


    http://www.waroverholland.nl/index.p...hague-ypenburg

    #2
    A great read! Thanks!

    Gerry

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      #3
      Well, one needs to read various accounts from multiple sources and develop your own balanced objective view. The same is true for Kreta.
      Willi

      Preußens Gloria!

      Sapere aude - "Dare to know! Have the courage to use your own intelligence!" - Immanuel Kant

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        #4
        The use of airborne infantry always comes with a certain risk. Even with the D-Day landings albeit a succes, losses where high amongst paratroopers and other airborne units. We see the same thing with Market-Garden.

        If I recall the famous words of Major Dick Winters: We're paratroopers, we are supposed to be surrounded. If you look at it tactically, being surrounded is probably one of the biggest risks a commander could face when in the field.

        I say the use of airborne units is to delibaretaly take that risk in order to archieve a higher tactical goal. The use of these units are what I call a military gamble.

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          #5
          Originally posted by Nick U View Post
          The use of airborne infantry always comes with a certain risk. Even with the D-Day landings albeit a succes, losses where high amongst paratroopers and other airborne units. We see the same thing with Market-Garden.

          If I recall the famous words of Major Dick Winters: We're paratroopers, we are supposed to be surrounded. If you look at it tactically, being surrounded is probably one of the biggest risks a commander could face when in the field.

          I say the use of airborne units is to delibaretaly take that risk in order to archieve a higher tactical goal. The use of these units are what I call a military gamble.
          That may all be true. I will add that flank unit coordination, sector sketches and range cards for key weapons become immensely simplified when you are surrounded!😬

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            #6
            Originally posted by o.r.k. View Post
            I stumbled across this Dutch very detailled account on the battle of Ypenburg/the Hague. I only knew beforehand that this operation didn´t go very well, but reading it I was stunned about how wrong it almost went and the high amount of losses and POWs. It reads like a blueprint of the mistakes made in Crete again and somehow when planning the battle of Crete it seems that the lessons weren´t really learnt ( focus on the hoped surprise and throwing planes and men right into the enemy). I think it is interesting to read especially in such detail. It surely wasn´t that comforting being a Fj in these airborne operations.


            http://www.waroverholland.nl/index.p...hague-ypenburg
            You can also check this site, it is the same period as the attack on Ypenburg http://www.mei1940.nl/

            Regards,

            Danny

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