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Badges worn in combat, revisited

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    #31
    That's rich. Have a look at someone like Zhukov, so laden with medals that he could barely walk. Let's face it, the Russians gave out a medal for just about everything.

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      #32
      Hi,

      extract from the book 'Arnhem Spearhead' by James Sims who fought with Support Company, 2 Para and was captured at the Bridge:

      Page 91

      ' He gave me a hand out the window, which was about six feet above the pavement. Directly below me was a dead German soldier and I was forced to use his corpse as a rather gruesome stepping stone to the pavement. My heeled plates clinked against the metal badges that covered his chest, indicating that he was a veteran of many campaigns.'

      This would indicate that some soldiers wore the decorations in combat, it may have been that the deceased soldier was fighting in German held territory way behind the German lines so strictly speaking he wasn't on front line duty..

      Cheers,
      Rick

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        #33
        My question is why would one find, either as a ground dug relic or as a "liberated" souvenir from a prisoner, any medal for which only the ribbon was normally worn? - EKII being perhaps the most conspicuous example of such an award. Were they really fighting with all their medals in their pockets?

        Can anyone shed any more light on these so called inspections held with front line troops? I can't imagine there was much inspecting or parading done in the thick of battle.

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          #34
          Originally posted by ravrick View Post
          Hi,

          extract from the book 'Arnhem Spearhead' by James Sims who fought with Support Company, 2 Para and was captured at the Bridge:

          Page 91

          ' He gave me a hand out the window, which was about six feet above the pavement. Directly below me was a dead German soldier and I was forced to use his corpse as a rather gruesome stepping stone to the pavement. My heeled plates clinked against the metal badges that covered his chest, indicating that he was a veteran of many campaigns.'

          This would indicate that some soldiers wore the decorations in combat, it may have been that the deceased soldier was fighting in German held territory way behind the German lines so strictly speaking he wasn't on front line duty..

          Cheers,
          Rick
          An excellent book - I always remember that part.
          Also when someone blows a raspberry at the German officer from within the ranks of prisoners


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            #35
            Originally posted by Steinar View Post
            probably lots of remains since they got out.. I guess the body can't handle the pressure from an explosion at close range.. such a sad story yes, imagine the stories Mr. Wittmann had. He was a true German hero.
            Joe Ekins didn’t consider him a “hero “ and found it very unpleasant that people saw it that way. Just another German invader that would have killed him if he didn’t get him first.

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