Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Is this a 50s set of USMC uniform? Need opinions!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Is this a 50s set of USMC uniform? Need opinions!

    Hi guys! I just got this set of uniform of an USMC major general. The seller said it was made in the 1950s, I would like to hear your opinions. Thanks!
    2e1fcca8f1a50dbc08cded0a6a374d4.jpg

    EGAs and general's stars are all made by Sterling.
    50ba296dc099223a027bfd400346a2c.jpg

    I think this looks like the 1944 pattern EGA, is that right?
    微信图片_20200626150705.jpg

    ​​The uniform was made by A.M.Bolognese&Son, I think they made uniform for the Marine during 40s to 80s?
    3598e3c3c03f21fad6a6d6451445810.jpg

    The coat has a tag of "USMC serial 369"
    4efa190ed3f0ad4ec32c8ea27d5e19e.jpg

    The trousers also have a tag of serial but there's no numbers.
    49507d4fe74bdbfb1d6226efd340dc3.jpg

    The seller said the trousers have "Conmar" aluminum zipper, is that so? What does "Conmar" mean?
    9e95e3d74d010a67979e072f498d0b3.jpg

    What's your opinion about this set? Much appreciate!

    #2
    EGAs are seem to be 1962 pattern, because there are chain on the anchor is that right? So what about the coat and trouser?

    Comment


      #3
      The EGAs are the standard officer's type introduced in 1955, and I would expect them to be marked sterling. The anchors are "fouled", meaning they have the rope and are the distinctive pattern Marines still use today.

      The blues are regular officer's issue, produced from a material use up until the late 1990's. Nice looking uniform, but without a name on the tag it's a blue dress blouse with General's stars added. s/f Robert

      Comment


        #4
        It's hard to date this type of material, if not attributed to a Marine by name or added features. Here's two Marine officers, and the one on the right is wearing 1930's blues. The one on the left is wearing a 2019 issue blouse - side by side, they are almost identical.

        Bolognese made uniforms from WWI until the 1990's, and then sold bits and pieces to present.

        s/f Robert
        Attached Files

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by RobertE View Post
          The EGAs are the standard officer's type introduced in 1955, and I would expect them to be marked sterling. The anchors are "fouled", meaning they have the rope and are the distinctive pattern Marines still use today.

          The blues are regular officer's issue, produced from a material use up until the late 1990's. Nice looking uniform, but without a name on the tag it's a blue dress blouse with General's stars added. s/f Robert
          Thx, mate. The EGAs do have ‘sterling’ on their back. Is there any difference between this type of EGA and the current type? I think the golden part on the Globe looks slightly different from my 2019 EGAs made by Vanguard.
          I haven’t got an eye on the name tag because the set is still on the way. The seller couldn’t find the tag, where would it be normally? I have a coat made by SACO and its tag is in the left inner pocket, but this coat has more pockets. I’ve also heard some uniform has its tag on ‘left sleeve lining’ or even in back pockets of the trousers.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by RobertE View Post
            It's hard to date this type of material, if not attributed to a Marine by name or added features. Here's two Marine officers, and the one on the right is wearing 1930's blues. The one on the left is wearing a 2019 issue blouse - side by side, they are almost identical.

            Bolognese made uniforms from WWI until the 1990's, and then sold bits and pieces to present.

            s/f Robert
            Thx, mate! The only difference I can tell is on the older coat, the four lines on the upper chest are prominent instead of recessed. I compared this one and some vintage coats’ photos with my another coat made by SACO few years ago.

            Comment


              #7
              The Marine EGAs today are identical to the ones on your uniform, but the sterling marking is a good indication they are at least a few decades old. The continent planchets and anchor were solid gold on some earlier patterns, but always plated or anodized on this pattern. Sometimes an anti-tarnish clear coat on the gold surfaces can cause them to have a shade difference over time.

              The name, if present, will be on the tailor tag inside the internal breast pocket. Sometimes the tags are in other - very visible - places on the lining as well. Names stamped in sleeves is typically an enlisted feature, but never on a set of officers dress blues. If the trousers have a tailor label, it's typically sewn to the inside pocket bag.

              You won't be able to tell much of a difference examining the blues for clues to their age. Most tailors used their 1940's stocks until they were exhausted, and uniform shops had plenty of stocks. I know Bolognese used fittings and hardware from his extensive stock of material to make uniforms, and since he opened his doors in 1918, he was still using old collar hooks, internal sword clips, and other pieces into the 1990's.

              I bought my leather garrison belt from him in the 1990's, and it was nicely boxed in my size. When I got it to the barracks, I saw the box was dated summer of 1944 and the belt wasn't black, but was cordovan brown and it cracked when I uncoiled it. Old man Bolognese gave me another one but I kept the brass hardware; he also sold me a sword hanger with enough brass on it to be used for an anchor. Anyway, in most cases you can't tell the old from the new - the chest pleats on both those uniforms in the photo are sewn the same manner. That's me on the right, my son on the left.

              s/f Robert

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by RobertE View Post
                The Marine EGAs today are identical to the ones on your uniform, but the sterling marking is a good indication they are at least a few decades old. The continent planchets and anchor were solid gold on some earlier patterns, but always plated or anodized on this pattern. Sometimes an anti-tarnish clear coat on the gold surfaces can cause them to have a shade difference over time.

                The name, if present, will be on the tailor tag inside the internal breast pocket. Sometimes the tags are in other - very visible - places on the lining as well. Names stamped in sleeves is typically an enlisted feature, but never on a set of officers dress blues. If the trousers have a tailor label, it's typically sewn to the inside pocket bag.

                You won't be able to tell much of a difference examining the blues for clues to their age. Most tailors used their 1940's stocks until they were exhausted, and uniform shops had plenty of stocks. I know Bolognese used fittings and hardware from his extensive stock of material to make uniforms, and since he opened his doors in 1918, he was still using old collar hooks, internal sword clips, and other pieces into the 1990's.

                I bought my leather garrison belt from him in the 1990's, and it was nicely boxed in my size. When I got it to the barracks, I saw the box was dated summer of 1944 and the belt wasn't black, but was cordovan brown and it cracked when I uncoiled it. Old man Bolognese gave me another one but I kept the brass hardware; he also sold me a sword hanger with enough brass on it to be used for an anchor. Anyway, in most cases you can't tell the old from the new - the chest pleats on both those uniforms in the photo are sewn the same manner. That's me on the right, my son on the left.

                s/f Robert
                Wow! That's impressive! Thank you very much Robert! I'll update more photos after it arrived. Especially the name tag, I'll try to find it.

                Comment


                  #9
                  The small tag with the red lettering dates from the 1950s/1960s.
                  Steve
                  ~ The true test of a democracy is how well it protects the rights of its least popular citizens. ~

                  ~ Never cross swords with an unworthy opponent. ~

                  Comment


                    #10
                    ...and the 1980's/1990's, unfortunately, so these blues could have been made over a 40 year span.

                    s/f Robert

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by RobertE View Post
                      ...and the 1980's/1990's, unfortunately, so these blues could have been made over a 40 year span.

                      s/f Robert
                      Do they still have the tag on blues today? I can see the tag on my another coat(don't know when it was made) with the same words but the numbers are "411" instead of "365"

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I don't know. I know they still had them through the 1980's-1990's. The point is your blouse was made over a forty year period, at least, and dating it to a specific period won't be possible without a name.

                        Also without a name, it is a standard officer's blouse which could have belonged to a second lieutenant as well as a general. Insignia purchase is a click away. It will display nicely, but without provinence - like a name and hopefully date - that's all it will be.

                        s/f Robert
                        Attached Files

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X