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Japanese Sword for Review - Machine Made (WWII)?

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    #16
    Thanks,Ben - great information on the "Kojiri" piece . . . . . it is nice to see that there is some availability of these at modest prices.


    BTW: Can anyone elaborate on why this sword has a metal scabbard? The vast majority of the WWII-era Japanese officer's swords that I have seen utilize wooden scabbards (typically covered with leather). I am familiar with the metal scabbards found on NCO's swords. Any thoughts/ideas on the choice of scabbard material would be welcome.


    Also, is there any way to trace the "Mon" piece that is affixed to the handle? Not knowing the correct Japanese term, I always just called this little silver piece a "family crest". I do very much like the personalization of the sword with the Mon piece.
    Attached Files

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      #17
      Don't buy anything from that con artist!

      That's a pretty big dent in that saya, is the wood liner intact?

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        #18
        As I understand it, any Japanese family could buy any Mon they wanted so it's a waste of time placing any importance on a sword that has one unless you can trace and collaborate the soldiers identity and family history. A tall order..

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          #19
          Originally posted by Logan09 View Post
          Don't buy anything from that con artist!

          That's a pretty big dent in that saya, is the wood liner intact?
          As usual, when you try to help, someone else will come along and try to sh it on you.

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            #20
            Originally posted by BenVK View Post
            As usual, when you try to help, someone else will come along and try to sh it on you.

            Well, sort of. "Samuraimonkey" has a bad rep of changing parts of swords, reworking, and flags. For his flags, see here, from post #45 on down.


            --Guy

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              #21
              I gave a link to one frikin part and now you want to hang me?!

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                #22
                Originally posted by BenVK View Post
                I gave a link to one frikin part and now you want to hang me?!
                That "you" is generic, right; not directed towards me, right? Because I'm not out to hang you (or anything else).

                Logan09 was sending a caution about the seller ... I don't think he was trying to shoot you down. You were being helpful to Alan.


                -- Guy

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by BenVK View Post
                  I gave a link to one frikin part and now you want to hang me?!
                  I just stated not to buy from this guy! I didn't say anything against you for posting the link to the part he needs did i?

                  No need to derail this any further.

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by Luis22 View Post
                    That's a beautiful shingunto sword...also has a Mon,,,on e bay they go for around $1000.
                    If it goes for $1000 on eBay take off the fees and it’s back down to $850

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by BenVK View Post
                      Just an observation but very long nakago on this blade that's been shortened.
                      Unusual for a run of the mill showato?
                      Yes, I noticed that too. Not normal for a blade made for the military. But as we all know, exceptions are the norm when it comes to WWII gunto!

                      Alan,

                      I can't find that mon on either of the english language sites for mons that I use, but I recently saw that same mon on a shrine donor wall in Naraita JP, so I know it's still being used. I wish I had taken a picture of it now. The plaque had the donor info and we might have gleaned a name.

                      As to the saya - metal saya were the norm for gunto. Yes, there are many wooden saya covered in leather. Some (I think Ohmura used the terms) called the metal "formal" and the leather covered "combat" saya, but there were quite a mix used. There were also metal saya tightly covered in leather. Often you will find old, donated blades fitted out in wooden/leather saya, but then, you'll find showato in them as well. Like you said, this was often simply an option chosen by the buying officer.

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                        #26
                        Update: My offer was accepted, so I am now the proud new owner of the sword!


                        I very much appreciate the assistance that each of you have provided.


                        Alan

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by Alan Smith View Post
                          Update: My offer was accepted, so I am now the proud new owner of the sword! I very much appreciate the assistance that each of you have provided.
                          Congratulations! By the way, the mon is called "Descending Wisteria" り藤 Sagari Fuji; it could be "Ascending Wisteria" Agari Fuji ... depending on the direction of the flowers.

                          This fuji is not to be confused with Mt. Fuji which is written 富士.


                          The "descending wisteria" mon was used by the Fujiwara Clan [established by Fujiwara no Kamatari; earlier name was Nakatomi no Kamatari] as well as by some famous generals (and others, later).

                          Kuroda Kanbei [Sengoku Period]
                          Kato Yoshiaki [Sengoku Period]
                          Ishida Mitsunari [possibly used]
                          Misora Hibari [actress, singer, cultural icon 1937- 1989]
                          Tsukawa Masahiko [actor, 1940-2018]

                          About "Ascending Fuji:
                          As the Fujiwara family became more powerful, the spread of cadet branches increased. In order to distinguish between the head family and the cadet house, a family crest of “Agarifuji” was created.

                          Rising wisteria takes the shape of a reversed "descending wisteria."
                          Descending wisteria is considered to be unlucky because it is shaped like “flowers falling down”, and there is also the theory that the wisteria crest was born from that.

                          There is also the theory that the ascending wisteria was born in the hope of the fall of the descending wisteria.

                          -- Guy
                          Attached Files

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by GHP View Post
                            Congratulations! By the way, the mon is called "Descending Wisteria" り藤 Sagari Fuji; it could be "Ascending Wisteria" Agari Fuji ... depending on the direction of the flowers.

                            This fuji is not to be confused with Mt. Fuji which is written 富士.


                            The "descending wisteria" mon was used by the Fujiwara Clan [established by Fujiwara no Kamatari; earlier name was Nakatomi no Kamatari] as well as by some famous generals (and others, later).

                            Kuroda Kanbei [Sengoku Period]
                            Kato Yoshiaki [Sengoku Period]
                            Ishida Mitsunari [possibly used]
                            Misora Hibari [actress, singer, cultural icon 1937- 1989]
                            Tsukawa Masahiko [actor, 1940-2018]

                            About "Ascending Fuji:



                            -- Guy

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