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Nice Sword with signed Tsuba and over 29 in. blade for discussion!

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    Nice Sword with signed Tsuba and over 29 in. blade for discussion!

    Nice Sword with signed Tsuba and over 29 in. blade for discussion!

    Hey folks,

    I recently picked this up with some other swords and noticed it has a signed Tsuba.

    The blade is not signed but has a killer active Hamon.

    I was told from another sword collector that it looks like it is from the shinto 1597 -1780 period.

    The only "damage" I can see are a few tiny pits on one side.

    Could the Tsuba signature confirm that timeframe?

    thanks for any info.

    Cheers D
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    #2
    1
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      #3
      2
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        #4
        Here is the TSUBA and the rough spot I mentioned.

        thanks for any assistance dating this great sword

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          #5
          Sword

          Nice Katana, unfortunately you cant date the blade by the fittings as your average owner back in the day would have several sets of fittings, not to mention ownership changes over time. But your sword looks to be of that period. Pitting on the cutting edge shows how thin the metal is after numerous polishes in its lifetime. Sword must be enjoyed as is as any detailed polish will usually only make the holes larger! Touchup polish might work though.

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            #6
            The tsuba is presenting upside-down. When rotated, all I can make out are the last two kanji on the left:


            *家作
            the missing kanji is not these two, but something similar with that "roof" radical, something like or , ETC.


            --Guy

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              #7
              It looks like the nakago has been reworked possible to remove a signature??
              Interesting Hamon I would be tempted to have a window (have a small area polished) opened
              Rough areas on the tsuba are where inlay has fallen out

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                #8
                Looks like one of the fakes being sold on eBay with flamboyant hamon and fake aged Nakago to me.

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                  #9
                  reeder3,

                  yes, I did ask for opinions but that is quite blunt and non supported statement.

                  Odd, a few of the folks that are earlier in this post have not even hinted to your "off the cuff" thoughts on this sword. Quite the opposite actually since some have shot me PMs about it. I have corresponded with some of them from time to time over the years and greatly respect their opinion based on the way the speak to fellow newer Japanese sword collectors like me and their thousands of posts just in this Japanese forum. I have learned a great deal here on WAF and will continue to do so.

                  I request that you back up your statement with facts.. better yet would other Japanese sword collectors reading this post please answer this question.

                  Is this a authentic hand made Japanese sword from 200-400 years ago or is it a cheap Chinese fake?

                  Jumper

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                    #10
                    Of the 2 comments related to the sword, it looks like one questioned the integrity of the nakago and I’m not alone as you claim. The other I spoke to on the phone this morning to discuss the sword and they ended up questioning it as well. I simply stated it looks like the fakes being sold on eBay. Go look for yourself and form your own conclusion. They usually use the title of The Japanese Samurai Sword. You could also submit it to shinsa next time they are stateside for an opinion and attribution if they believe it is genuine, which would clear the air and be much more reliable than someone with thousands of posts here, which doesn’t mean a thing.

                    I see now why you’re so upset with my opinion since you have posted it for sale. It can be easily turned back on you, where’s the substantiation it’s authentic? What school/group of smiths from 200-400 years ago does the hamon, shape, nakago, etc match? And where are the examples to support your (or these experts’) claims? Everyone here is basing their opinion on their own research and experience. For me, I’d pass.

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                      #11
                      I hadn’t considered fake just thought the nakago had been messed with do you have a link to examples being sold on eBay?

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                        #12
                        I didn't really consider the fake part either but..... Since you mentioned that I think it is a distinct possibility. There are some really odd features to this sword and obviously a new wrap and more.
                        Bob
                        www.collectortocollectormilitaria.com

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by Steve Flanagan View Post
                          Nice Katana, unfortunately you cant date the blade by the fittings as your average owner back in the day would have several sets of fittings, not to mention ownership changes over time. But your sword looks to be of that period. Pitting on the cutting edge shows how thin the metal is after numerous polishes in its lifetime. Sword must be enjoyed as is as any detailed polish will usually only make the holes larger! Touchup polish might work though.
                          When it comes to gendai, nihonto, I'm not an expert. But I would second Steve's comments here. I've never seen a Chinese fake with metalurgical flaws that have been exposed by multiple polishings, like this one. I agree, somewhere in it's life, someone has re-filed the nakago, but the shape of the nakago looks legit (as oposed to most Chinese fake nakagos), and fittings got swapped/replaced/ugraded by the Japanese owners and post-war owners alike.

                          If I was selling this, I'd simply point out these issues, in full disclosure, and let the buyer make his own decision.

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by BruceP View Post
                            When it comes to gendai, nihonto, I'm not an expert. But I would second Steve's comments here. I've never seen a Chinese fake with metalurgical flaws that have been exposed by multiple polishings, like this one. I agree, somewhere in it's life, someone has re-filed the nakago, but the shape of the nakago looks legit (as oposed to most Chinese fake nakagos), and fittings got swapped/replaced/ugraded by the Japanese owners and post-war owners alike.
                            ...
                            First off -- I am not any sort of expert ... more of a "looker/learner". Be that as it may, I tend to agree with what Bruce said. I also note that the nakago-ana has more of a punch-shape ... the hole looks "countersunk", which you don't find on modern drilled nakago .... right?


                            --Guy
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                              #15
                              Looking again, I don't think fake but it has had work done to it, probably not by Japanese hands. I would like to see what the real curvature of the blade looks like, just for kicks. Either way, I hope you did not pay much for it. All it has going for it is length and a fancy temper and still not a sword I would want.
                              Bob
                              www.collectortocollectormilitaria.com

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