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Japanese blacksmith, sword.

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    Japanese blacksmith, sword.

    Hello,

    You can identify the blacksmith and the inscriptions on this sword.

    What do you think?

    Thank you very much.











    #2
    You will need much clearer pictures of the signature as they are too blurry for me to read. Also you have the signature posted upside down and sideways which complicates matters. The nakago should be posted with the butt end at the bottom and the top towards the cutting edge in a vertical shot. The correct term is sword smith, not black smith.

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      #3
      Here are better photos. You are right.





      Comment


        #4
        濃州住亮信
        Nōshū Jū Akinobu
        Akinobu of Nōshū [modern Gifu]
        [亮信 is also read as Sukenobu]

        昭和十八年一月
        Showa 18 [1943], January

        mune:
        名ホ1
        Na-Ho 1
        Perhaps Nagoya

        Page 25, bottom.
        "Akinobu", civilian name Toki Yūichi 土岐雄一, born 2 January 1907, student of Kanenobu 兼延, died 14 May 1993, he was working as rikugun-jumei-tosho; he is also listed with the reading "Sukenobu."


        --Guy

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          #5
          Awesome. Thanks a lot for your help.

          Comment


            #6
            You didn't clean the tang did you? I guess I would not worry so much about cleaning this one but I would not do it again, especially an older hand forged sword.
            Thanks!
            Bob
            www.collectortocollectormilitaria.com

            sigpic

            Comment


              #7
              Hello,

              No I did not clean the silk with the signature. I picked up the sword like that. I do not touch her.

              Comment


                #8
                The stamps on the nakago mune (spine of the tang) are the inpspector marks of the Nagoya Arasenal and Kokura First Arsenal


                 小
                 Army Arsenal Kokura First Factory inspection mark: "Ho".


                 名
                 Army Arsenal Nagoya Factory - Nagoya Army Arsenal inspection mark: "Mei"

                This will USUALLY mean the blade was non-traditionally made, however exceptions are found to exist.

                Comment


                  #9


                  Originally posted by BruceP View Post
                   
                   Army Arsenal Kokura First Factory inspection mark: "Ho".
                  But Bruce hit the wrong key .... he meant to say:


                  ho; katakana syllabary.


                  --Guy

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by GHP View Post




                    But Bruce hit the wrong key .... he meant to say:


                    ho; katakana syllabary.


                    --Guy
                    Oops! Guinness, Schwartzenegger movie, and typing - all at the same time. I guess I don't multi-task very well!

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                      #11
                      This is a traditional sword not?

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by lokomilo View Post
                        This is a traditional sword not?
                        Maybe some guys who study nihonto can give an opinion. Arsenal inspector stamps normally mean "non-traditional ", but I say "normally" because I've just acquired a star-stamped gunto with an Arsenal inspector stamp on the nakago mune like yours. Star stamped gunto are supposed to be traditionally made, so the inspector stamp creates a mystery.

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                          #13
                          Thank you for your reply. The sword and the blacksmith are identified as traditional. For the stamp, traditional blades could also be inspected in arsenal. There is no seki stamp on the blade. Just the inscriptions on the slice of the silk.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by BruceP View Post
                             名
                             Army Arsenal Nagoya Factory - Nagoya Army Arsenal inspection mark: "Mei"
                            Bruce-the-Multitasker

                            Let me explain to others. 名 is pronounced "mei" and "na".

                            Generally speaking *ALL* kanji have a minimum of two pronunciations: Japanese and Chinese [from the time Japan borrowed the kanji]; sometimes there are 6 or more different readings!

                            Native Japanese pronunciation is called Kun-yomi (meaning-reading) -- these are native Japanese words used before Chinese sounds were incorporated .... [like the way Norman-French words are now "English" (beef=cow; pork=pig; etc.) since the Norman Conquest in 1066.]

                            Chinese pronunciation is called On-yomi [sound-reading].

                            Here's a short article that is quite informative.


                            Back to the sword...

                            Kun: na; ~na
                            On: myo; mei
                            Japanese names: To

                            Ergo, 古屋 is Nagoya





                            It's HARDER than rocket science!

                            --Guy

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Guy, That makes you smarter than a rocket scientist!

                              I thought it was odd. I grabbed that line from the Ohmura site (NCO page on stamps). I hadn't noticed it ever being called "mei" until then.

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