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Type-95 NCO sword for review

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    Type-95 NCO sword for review

    Hey there guys,

    A few weeks a go a I posted some pics of a Type-95 NCO sword I was looking at. Well, I bought said sword and wanted to show it off here with my own photos and get your opinions once again. She definitely has a bit of a 'war horse' kinda feel to her. She is of one of the earlier variations (though not the earliest) with the painted aluminum Tsuka, brass Tsuba, and iron Saya with horseshoe chape. The paint is pretty well worn from the the Tsuka and the Saya but there is definitely still some there for both. Is there any kind of preservation techniques you guys recommend for the blade and the Brass Tsuba (which has a bit of tarnishing)?

    oh, and scabbard and blade match

    Your feedback is always appreciated!
    Attached Files

    #2
    Scabbard serial number
    Attached Files

    Comment


      #3
      You'll find all you need in this article for Sword care and etiquette here: http://www.nbthk-ab.org/swordcare.pdf

      Be sure not to use any brass cleaners, or chemical cleaners on the tsuba and seppa. They were "colorized" and the cleaners remove all the original color and leave just shiny brass, which is NOT original at all. I have tried all the ideas for removing the black stains on the blade and haven't found anything that works. So, just use the uchiko and light oil. I would never sand the blade or use a buffer. The result is never original in look, and obvious to other collectors.

      I'm the kind of guy that has to take everything apart. I clean, with an oiled rag (the choji oil in the cleaning kit), sometimes soapy rag to remove stubborn grime), all the parts; wipe them dry, and re-assemble. It's a little risky, as the Type 95s have a known habit of being a little loose once re-assembled about half the time. But, it's not much wiggle when it happens, and I'd rather eliminate the grime.

      Glad you enjoy your new 95! I have 8 now and love each of them.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by BruceP View Post
        You'll find all you need in this article for Sword care and etiquette here: http://www.nbthk-ab.org/swordcare.pdf

        Be sure not to use any brass cleaners, or chemical cleaners on the tsuba and seppa. They were "colorized" and the cleaners remove all the original color and leave just shiny brass, which is NOT original at all. I have tried all the ideas for removing the black stains on the blade and haven't found anything that works. So, just use the uchiko and light oil. I would never sand the blade or use a buffer. The result is never original in look, and obvious to other collectors.

        I'm the kind of guy that has to take everything apart. I clean, with an oiled rag (the choji oil in the cleaning kit), sometimes soapy rag to remove stubborn grime), all the parts; wipe them dry, and re-assemble. It's a little risky, as the Type 95s have a known habit of being a little loose once re-assembled about half the time. But, it's not much wiggle when it happens, and I'd rather eliminate the grime.

        Glad you enjoy your new 95! I have 8 now and love each of them.
        Thank you Bruce! Your feedback is much appreciated!

        What exactly is the black staining on the blade?

        and in your opinion, what year was my sword likely produced?.. my guess is 1940 or 1941, based upon what I've read.

        Comment


          #5
          I haven't been able to find anyone that can explain the stains. One guy thought is was chemicals from the wood leaching into the steel, but another said the woods used for gunto were picked specifically to avoid that, and therefore it might be something coming out of the steel itself.

          The years on these are very tough to gauge. They were making 18-20,000 of these per year, on average, so personally, I'd put this more '39ish. You can't use that for the 100,000, and 200,000 ranges as the numbers were assigned in blocks to different arsenals. But from "O" to "5400" it should be save to make that estimation.

          Comment


            #6
            I thought the stains were "spider rust" ... I think we've all seen blackish stains/rust pitting; or am I missing something? Granted, I've not magnified the images, nor have I looked that closely. My first thought was .... finger printing or moisture stains.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by BruceP View Post
              I haven't been able to find anyone that can explain the stains. One guy thought is was chemicals from the wood leaching into the steel, but another said the woods used for gunto were picked specifically to avoid that, and therefore it might be something coming out of the steel itself.

              The years on these are very tough to gauge. They were making 18-20,000 of these per year, on average, so personally, I'd put this more '39ish. You can't use that for the 100,000, and 200,000 ranges as the numbers were assigned in blocks to different arsenals. But from "O" to "5400" it should be save to make that estimation.
              Hm, very interesting. I find these swords to be really intriguing in general. Am correct in understanding that these swords, unlike the officers swords of other nations, were expected/designed for actual combat use?

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by GHP View Post
                I thought the stains were "spider rust" ... I think we've all seen blackish stains/rust pitting; or am I missing something? Granted, I've not magnified the images, nor have I looked that closely. My first thought was .... finger printing or moisture stains.
                I think this blade has all the above on it. That big blotch near the tsuba is likely what you mention. I was speaking to the black spots that are found that have no corrosion, the surface is smooth. I've taken the liners out of my 95s and the spots often line up with wet, black stains on the liners, but not always.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by hale1940 View Post

                  Hm, very interesting. I find these swords to be really intriguing in general. Am correct in understanding that these swords, unlike the officers swords of other nations, were expected/designed for actual combat use?
                  Yes, Type 95s were not "dress" or "parade" swords. But they were factory blades, made without the folding of the officer blades. Hardened edge, but no real hamon to speak of. Lots of good info on them here: http://ohmura-study.net/957.html

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by BruceP View Post

                    Yes, Type 95s were not "dress" or "parade" swords. But they were factory blades, made without the folding of the officer blades. Hardened edge, but no real hamon to speak of. Lots of good info on them here: http://ohmura-study.net/957.html
                    Thank you Bruce! I have actually been picking my way through that site for a bit already - next to K98k’s (my other very inexpensive collecting hobby lol) I’m finding these Shin-Gunto’s to be more and more fascinating.

                    Where do you think is the best place for someone to hunt for a nice example of a Type-98 gunto? And what do you think are the reasonable going rates these days?


                    Comment


                      #11
                      I have a good friend that is down-sizing his sizable collection right now! Depends on your budget and desires, but I bet he'd have something you'd love. Contact Neil (IJASWORDS) at NMB: https://www.militaria.co.za/nmb/profile/3858-ijaswords/ and let him know what you're looking for.

                      Type 98s are recovering from the COVID hit on the market. They run from $900 to $30,000 depending what you're looking for. Most standard war swords are in the $1,000 - $2,500 range.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by BruceP View Post
                        I have a good friend that is down-sizing his sizable collection right now! Depends on your budget and desires, but I bet he'd have something you'd love. Contact Neil (IJASWORDS) at NMB: https://www.militaria.co.za/nmb/profile/3858-ijaswords/ and let him know what you're looking for.

                        Type 98s are recovering from the COVID hit on the market. They run from $900 to $30,000 depending what you're looking for. Most standard war swords are in the $1,000 - $2,500 range.
                        Ya thats the price range I've kind of been seeing as well. And Ill definitely fire your friend a message.

                        Thanks again!

                        Comment

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