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Afghanistan bring backs. What all do you have?

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    Afghanistan bring backs. What all do you have?












    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    #2
    I looked the whole time I was there to bring something back. The closest I came was under a house and I could see some old clay pots at the other side. I was scared to get bitten by a snake so I did not go any further. In the same house I had found some Russian binoculars and should have kept them. That was in Charkh. It was the same in Iraq. I was always looking for old stuff, but it seems like they do not keep anything nor does anything hold any sentimental value. Yeah there were guns and ordinance everywhere, but no old swords or things. We did have a Russian PPSH and drum, but could find no ammo for it. It was war time dated and in really nice shape. We had also found an Israeli MG42 copy, but had no links for it.

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      #3
      Does the poster say “Wanted Cannon Fodder experience not needed” ? Rob
      God please take justin bieber and gave us dio back

      Comment


        #4
        1st Gen 3-hole handguard set and buttstock SVD furniture set, captured in Paktika Province. Rifle was destroyed, but the wood survived to make it here.

        Attached Files

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          #5
          Hi Gents,

          I was stationed at CP Coiner in Kabul. "Hajimart" opened every Friday in an open area near the outer perimeter. As I was there fairly early in our involvement (04 - 05), there was a lot a choose to from. I picked up two M1917 style steel helmets. One was originally Austrian and the other a "Cavalry cut-out" of indeterminate origin. I had the Austrian relic professionally restored to its World War One configuration painted in Isonzo brown. I donated this to our town history museum. Kids can pick it and take a selfie wearing it and learn about the town's doughboys. I left the "cav" helmet in relic condition. Its buried in a box somewhere in the basement. The real score was the medal collection which I was able to put together during my six months in country. Its hard to find these Soviet era medals with the correct ribbon. I also picked up a lot of obsolete currency. It was cheap and easy to stick in an envelope to send to the folks back home. I had enough dough to pass out to all the civilians sitting on the shuttle bus that picked us up at Baltimore-Washington International. The civilians didn't what make of the wild-eyed DCU clad G.I.s wreaking of alcohol and very excited to be back in the USA. I'm also very happy with my "Masood, Lion of the Panshir" prayer rug. I remember the MPs searching though my stuff at the Bagram pax terminal. I couldn't believe some of the vintage weapons and blades stacked up nearby. I hope that pile didn't end up in a smelter. In any event, I consider myself very lucky to have arrived back home relatively unscathed and with plenty of cool stuff to show for my luxury short tour.

          All the best,
          TJ

          thumbnail_IMG_9972.jpg thumbnail_IMG_9970.jpg 267716-R1-00-25_024_0001.jpg
          Attached Files

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            #6
            TJ, first and foremost, thank you for your service. Very cool stuff you posted, thank you for sharing.

            Did you keep your helmet and uniforms? I would really like to see pictures of them if you did.
            When you go home
            Tell them for us and say
            For your tomorrow
            We gave our today

            --Inscription in the 5th Marine Division cemetery,
            Iwo Jima 1945

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              #7
              Hi Walter,

              As a Vietnam veteran once replied to me when I thanked him for his service, "You're very welcome. Now let's work together to keep America a country worth fighting for."

              I did keep my helmet and uniforms. I won my k-pot in a poker game in Korea. The U.S. Army Rapid Equipping Force (REF) issued me a MICH helmet while I was in country which I still have as well. I tried to turn it in at my last duty station, West Point, but they wouldn't take it because it wasn't standard issue at the time.

              In any event Sir, to avoid hijacking the thread of my fellow Sooner, Hayden, and to avoid the ire of the moderators, I'll start a new thread over on the U.S. militaria forum. I'll post my "fobosite" gear there in the hope that real warriors will show us the monster rucks they wore while going from cave-to-cave in the hunt for Mullah Omar.

              Talk to you soon,
              TJ, OU '99G

              Comment


                #8
                Out of all the militaria-related stuff you can find in Afghanistan, I can think of nothing better than a WWI German cut-out helmet. Would like to see more pics of that one if you eventually unbury it from your basement. Doesn't seem to be in relic condition, more like salty. Cool pick ups, enjoyed the other thread in the US forum as well.

                Best,

                Nick

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Nicolas P. View Post
                  Out of all the militaria-related stuff you can find in Afghanistan, I can think of nothing better than a WWI German cut-out helmet. Would like to see more pics of that one if you eventually unbury it from your basement. Doesn't seem to be in relic condition, more like salty. Cool pick ups, enjoyed the other thread in the US forum as well.

                  Best,

                  Nick
                  Hi Nick,

                  I'm on vacation next week. I'll dig it out and take some decent photos outside.

                  Thanks,
                  TJ

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Guardian 5 View Post
                    Hi Gents,

                    I was stationed at CP Coiner in Kabul. "Hajimart" opened every Friday in an open area near the outer perimeter. As I was there fairly early in our involvement (04 - 05), there was a lot a choose to from. I picked up two M1917 style steel helmets. One was originally Austrian and the other a "Cavalry cut-out" of indeterminate origin. I had the Austrian relic professionally restored to its World War One configuration painted in Isonzo brown. I donated this to our town history museum. Kids can pick it and take a selfie wearing it and learn about the town's doughboys. I left the "cav" helmet in relic condition. Its buried in a box somewhere in the basement. The real score was the medal collection which I was able to put together during my six months in country. Its hard to find these Soviet era medals with the correct ribbon. I also picked up a lot of obsolete currency. It was cheap and easy to stick in an envelope to send to the folks back home. I had enough dough to pass out to all the civilians sitting on the shuttle bus that picked us up at Baltimore-Washington International. The civilians didn't what make of the wild-eyed DCU clad G.I.s wreaking of alcohol and very excited to be back in the USA. I'm also very happy with my "Masood, Lion of the Panshir" prayer rug. I remember the MPs searching though my stuff at the Bagram pax terminal. I couldn't believe some of the vintage weapons and blades stacked up nearby. I hope that pile didn't end up in a smelter. In any event, I consider myself very lucky to have arrived back home relatively unscathed and with plenty of cool stuff to show for my luxury short tour.

                    All the best,
                    TJ

                    thumbnail_IMG_9972.jpg thumbnail_IMG_9970.jpg 267716-R1-00-25_024_0001.jpg
                    Yes thanks for your service! And killer stuff!


                    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

                    Comment


                      #11
                      That Cut out is way cool . Rob
                      God please take justin bieber and gave us dio back

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Hello Nick and Rob,

                        Here are some slightly better pictures of the "cut-out." The lines are indeed elegant. What an incredible journey it had; from the Imperial Uhlans to the Kabuli lancers. Now it sits in a tupperware bin Derry, New Hampshire, USA, a rusted old relic of times gone by.

                        Thanks,
                        TJ

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                        Comment


                          #13
                          Thanks for the additional pics, TJ. It's still in pretty decent shape for such a journey of 100+ years. If only these things could talk...

                          Best,

                          Nick

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I brought more back from Iraq than Afghanistan.

                            both tours in Iraq (early war) I have a republican Guard shirt and Beret, BMP 1 gages that took off an abandoned BMP1, patches, collar tabs, shoulder boards, A bayonet. Biggest regret out of Iraq is not grabbing a few Feyadeen Helmets that we found in a compound.

                            Afghanistan: I had brought back some German WWI helmets like mentioned above, only one with the Triangle. I have since sold them. My biggest prize was a 1885 NA&A Martini Henry that is not decorated with Tribal crap and only thing not original to rifle is one barrel band (yes this came back legally through the Provost. Biggest regrets was not buying cheap British Colonial named medals and Soviet medals, but I didn’t have interest in them as I do now. One last regret, because I had thought it was a put together piece of crap was a Martini Henry Conversion to .303 Enfield. I forgot what is was called, but I have been told it is very rare - had a Lee Enfield front with a Martini back.

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                              #15
                              Back in 2002, I was flying USAF C-130s out of Seeb AB, Oman on supply runs throughout Afghanistan. On one visit to Kandahar, I noted an old, blown-out windsock between the runway and taxiway, and knew I had to have it for my squadron back in the States. I spoke to the airfield manager, and made a deal: a half-dozen Pizza Hut pizzas from my OL in Oman on my next visit if he'd have the windsock pulled out and waiting for me.

                              On my next visit through Kandahar a week later, he and his troops got their pizzas, and I got a beat-up canvas windsock attached to an 8-foot pole with a ball of concrete on the end. Back in Oman, I had the pole shortened a few feet and mounted to a sturdy wood and steel base (the Civil Engineers were always looking for projects), and flew it home with me in my trusty Hercules a month later. Like a proud parent, I placed the windsock in the foyer of my squadron. Unfortunately I never took any photos of it .

                              I returned to my old squadron a decade later, and the windsock was gone, with no one having ever seen it or knowing what happened to it.
                              Scott

                              "Frogs and locusts? Wouldn't that just be a plague of fat frogs?"

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