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  • Brian L.
    replied
    Originally posted by Destruction View Post
    Hey Brian,
    Happy New Year!
    There do exist post war made badges by Lerch, without any markings and different in size. I have one (see below). They are also described in Rosenwald's article anput FK Oberland.
    As for original badges/numbers, it's a bit tricky. I made a small research and realized that all officially awarded pieces with serial numbers up to approx.1000 are actually have hand engraved ciphers , and only those starting from 1000 have numbers factory stamped.
    Since early numbers were hand engraved by awardee, I tend to think that old Deschler marked badges without serial numbers are belonging to these first 1000 awarded, but not engraved.
    Lerch post war badge as an example.
    Thanks for the information. I always assumed the Deschler one I originally posted with '450' scratched into was from the first awarded batch.

    Leave a comment:


  • Destruction
    replied
    Originally posted by Brian L. View Post

    It probably was from original stock. Since the Oberland-Bund really didn't cease operations even during the Third Reich, I'm sure they had lots in stock and probably continued to manufacture them. I tend to consider any that are not marked on the back or that don't have serial numbers as later than the Freikorps period. .
    Hey Brian,
    Happy New Year!
    There do exist post war made badges by Lerch, without any markings and different in size. I have one (see below). They are also described in Rosenwald's article anput FK Oberland.
    As for original badges/numbers, it's a bit tricky. I made a small research and realized that all officially awarded pieces with serial numbers up to approx.1000 are actually have hand engraved ciphers , and only those starting from 1000 have numbers factory stamped.
    Since early numbers were hand engraved by awardee, I tend to think that old Deschler marked badges without serial numbers are belonging to these first 1000 awarded, but not engraved.
    Lerch post war badge as an example.
    You do not have permission to view this gallery.
    This gallery has 2 photos.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian L.
    replied
    Abzeichen für Dienstgrade der russische Westarmee (Badge for All Ranks of the Russian Western Army)

    By order no. 24 of March 4, 1919, Colonel Fürst Awaloff-Bermondt donated a badge in the form of a Maltese cross for the all military ranks of his volunteer troops. Colonel Potozki commander of Corps Graf Kellerprovided the draft of the award, which was intended to distinguish the members of his volunteer troops from other Baltic troops. The badge was based on the planned white Maltese cross of General Graf Keller's Russian White Army. However, as a sign of mourning (Count Keller was captured and shot in Kiev on December 20/21, 1918), the color was changed to black.


    Dienstgrade badge Russische Westarmee.jpg



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  • Brian L.
    replied
    Hindenburg-Bewährungsabzeichen des ehemaligen Selbstschutzbataillons Generalfeldmarschall von Hindenburg (1921)

    In May 1921, Major a.D. Waldow formed the Selbstschutz-Bataillon Generalfeldmarschall von Hindenburg consisting of volunteers from the cities of Braunschweig, Hanover, Clausthal and members of the Stahlhelmbund in Lower Saxony.
    The Freikorps was deployed in the 3rd Polish Uprising to secure the section from Reinersdorf to Simmenau. The initial strength was 35 officers and about 560 soldiers. Later its strength increased to almost 1,000 men. In June, the SS-Batl. Hindenburg was assigned to the Selbstschutz Regiment Nollau as the 2nd Battalion. After several loss-making fights for Zembowitz and Pruskau, the area was cleared of Polish insurgents. The Freikorps disbanded at the end of June 1921. Parts remained in Upper Silesia, while others returned to Lower Saxony.
    A probation decoration was given in autumn (September) 1921 by the former commandant Major a.D. Waldow of Selbstschutz-Bataillon Generalfeldmarschall von Hindenburg. After returning to Hanover, von Waldow founded the military association "Verband Hindenburg", which existed until 1927 and then became part of the Tannenbergbund. As chairman of Verband Hindenburg, he then donated the probation badge for well-deserved former Freikorps members of Selbstschutz-Bataillon Generalfeldmarschall von Hindenburg. The exact number of awards is not known. The awards were presumably continued after 1927 by the traditional associations. Badges with a wide needle and a thin needle are known. In 1934 the badge was banned by the Reichswehr and Interior Ministry.

    HindenburgBewährungsabzeichen1.jpg
    Last edited by Brian L.; 12-17-2020, 08:55 AM.

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  • Brian L.
    replied
    Originally posted by wilhelm Saris View Post
    I could get one form old stocks in silver. The regular red one was also from old stocks.
    I got that one at a Stahlhelm-meeting from one of the leading persons from that moment
    from Munich.
    It probably was from original stock. Since the Oberland-Bund really didn't cease operations even during the Third Reich, I'm sure they had lots in stock and probably continued to manufacture them. I tend to consider any that are not marked on the back or that don't have serial numbers as later than the Freikorps period. There were also badges for sale in the late 1950s into the 1960s by Deschler and Friedrich Sedlaczek. A new red members badge was produced in the 1960s which was different from the one from 1925.
    Also, the Kameradschaft Freikorps- und Bund Oberland led by Jürgen Popp still exists and has annual commemorations of the Battle of Annaberg.

    Here is a reference for some of the different Bund badges from different periods.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • wilhelm Saris
    replied
    Originally posted by bolewts58 View Post
    Yes it was. But, the edelweiss was different and I believe not marked on the reverse. So, those who know can tell the difference. Was your badge gilt and enamel or silver and enamel?
    I could get one form old stocks in silver. The regular red one was also from old stocks.
    I got that one at a Stahlhelm-meeting from one of the leading persons from that moment
    from Munich.

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian L.
    replied
    Originally posted by wilhelm Saris View Post
    This blue badge was also granted in later years. I had to come over to Munich to the Bund to collect one in the later eighties, when I was interested to get one!
    Yes it was. But, the edelweiss was different and I believe not marked on the reverse. So, those who know can tell the difference. Was your badge gilt and enamel or silver and enamel?

    Leave a comment:


  • wilhelm Saris
    replied
    Originally posted by bolewts58 View Post
    Freikorps Oberland Bewährungsabzeichen The exact number of awards is not known. But, it's estimated that 2,000 to as many as 3,000 were awarded. Most awarded badges (but not all) had the awardees serial number stamped, engraved or merely scratched on the reverse. The badge shown has the number '450' scratched to the right of the patent mark (Ges. Gesch.)
    This blue badge was also granted in later years. I had to come over to Munich to the Bund to collect one in the later eighties, when I was interested to get one!

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  • Peter J.
    replied
    Thanks for a very interesting elaboration of this decoration .


    cheers
    Peter

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  • Brian L.
    replied
    Ehrenzeichen der Freiwilligen Hundertschaft Krose

    (Badge of Honor for Volunteer 'Company' Krose - It's difficult to precisely translate "Hundertschaft" as it's an old German military term for a unit roughly the size of a company of 80-100 men, based on ancient Germanic tribal formations which themselves were modeled on the Roman 'Century'.

    Freiwillige Hundertschaft Krose was formed by Oberleutnant a.D. Wilhelm Krose (ex. Infanterie-Regiment Bremen (1. Hanseatisches) Nr. 75) when the 3rd Polish uprising in Upper Silesia began on May 3, 1921. It participated in the defence of the Pitschen, the fighting at Kostau and Seichwitz and on May 24-26 it participated in the storming of the Annaberg Mountain.

    The award was given by Oberleutnant a.D. Krose for those who had distinguished themselves principally in the defense of the city of Pitschen, as well as the storming of Annaberg and other associated struggles in Upper Silesia. Awards were manufactured by Heinrich Timm, Berlin based on a design by Krose. The central medallion shows the red and white stripes of the Bremen Hanseatic Cross in honor of Krose’s wartime service in Infantry regiment Bremen. In Ingo Haarcke's recent Book on Freikorps awards, he mistakenly attributes manufacturing to Wilhelm Deumer, Ludenscheid. However, it's more likely that Deumer merely acquired the overstock of crosses in the late 1920s or 30s. According to Haarcke, Deumer took the overstock crosses and turned them into bowling awards by replacing the central medallion with an image of a bowling pin. Many years ago I saw a version of this cross as a bowling award. The swords had been filed off. But, the reverse with the original inscription "For Meritorious Service in Upper Silesia" remained. That must have been confusing for the champion bowlers getting this cross!

    The exact number of awards or crosses manufactured is not known. However, since this Freikorps only formed the 3rd Company of Selbstschutz-Bataillon Pitschen from the city of Pitschen in Upper Silesia, it’s generally believed that around 100 crosses were awarded, although obviously more were produced. There are two known types of hinges: a long barrel type as shown here and a shorter block hinge which is considered to point to a second run of crosses later after the initial awards in 1921. I personally think it's just a manufacturing variation as Heinrich Timm was known to use both types of hinges as well as different types of pins.

    In any event, given the small number likely awarded and manufactured it is considered a comparatively rare award.

    I don't have the cross in hand yet. But, when I receive it, I'll post better pictures.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Brian L.; 02-01-2020, 05:08 AM.

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  • Brian L.
    replied
    The bronze one on the right was a commemorative "tinnie" given out to everyone attending the awards ceremony on April 9, 1934.
    It was struck by Kilian Ruckert from the same die used to create the silver-gilt center of the award badge.

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  • CRBeery
    replied
    A couple from me.
    Attached Files

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  • Brian L.
    replied
    "Wehrsport" prizes (Plaketten) for hand-grenade throwing, September 1919

    These are not expressly awards, but "Wehrsport" competition prizes. Still, I thought they would be appropriate for this thread.

    The Freikorps and Reichswehr held a number of "Wehrsport" competitions, usually in September from 1919 to 1921. These took the place of military maneuvers, which were banned by the Versailles Treaty. Given that the Armistice was seen merely as a truce by the Germans, they did what they could to keep their troops combat-ready just in case hostilities broke out again.

    While these sports competitions had traditional sports activities such as tug-of-war, wrestling, boxing, pole-vaulting, shot-put, racing etc. they also had shooting and hand-grenade throwing.

    These two prizes are for 1st and 2nd place in hand-grenade throwing given to the 1. bayer. Schützen-Regiment (Freikorps Epp).

    There was also a silver stickpin given out in 1919 and 1920 to all participants from Schützen-Brigade 21 which included the above regiment. The pin was round and had the same motif as these prizes.

    Attached is an example of the stickpin for 1920 from Andre Huesken's site.
    Attached Files

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  • Brian L.
    replied
    Commemorative Badge of Freikorps Würzburg (Erinnerungsplakette des Freikorps Würzburg)

    Freikorps Würzburg was formed from the Bavarian Reserve Jäger Batallion 15, which returned to Germany from Georgia in April 1919 after a long, circuitous sea voyage by British merchant ship from the Black Sea to northern Germany and by train south to Bavaria.

    Bavarian Reserve Jäger Batallion 15 had been formed in August 1918 in the Caucasus as the Kaukasisches Jäger-Regiment Nr. 1. It consisted of the bayerisches Reserve-Jäger-Bataillon and freshly trained released POWs who were formed into a Bahn-Schütz-Bataillon.
    On the 20th of September, 1918 they were renamed the bayerisches Reserve-Jäger-Bataillon Nr. 15 consisting of a staff and two battalions. The battalion was commanded by Major Martin Scheuring from the 8. B.I.R. who continued to command Freikorps Würzburg after its formation.

    Bavarian Reserve Jäger Regiment 15 arrived at the Würzburg train station on April 9, 1919 after their very long and arduous return home and immediately volunteered to form Freikorps Würzburg, got back on the train and headed to Munich to join other Freikorps already taking up positions outside the city. Freikorps Würzburg took part in the heavy fighting in Munich against the Munich Soviet Republic on May 2-3, 1919.

    After the defeat of the Munich Soviet, Freikorps Würzburg joined Detachement Probstmayer, Freikorps Aschaffenburg, Mobiles Freikorps Bamberg, Freikorps Bayreuth, Eiserne Schar Berthold and other smaller Freikorps units to form Reichswehr-Brigade 23.

    The commemorative badge was given to former members of Freikorps Würzburg in a ceremony on April 9, 1934, to celebrate the 15th anniversary of its formation.

    The 2-piece badge is 900 silver with a silver gilt center medallion and marked on the reverse: KILIAN RUCKERT, WÜRZBURG, 900.
    Attached Files

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  • Brian L.
    replied
    Bayerisches Schützenkorps (Freikorps Epp)
    Erinnerungsmedaille der Stabskompanie / Commemorative Medal of the Headquarters Company, 1921 (i.e. Staff)


    Not much is known about this very rare medal. But, it's assumed it was awarded to members of the Headquarters staff of the former Freikorps Epp to commemorate the two year anniversary of the founding of the HQ staff on April 18, 1919. It may have only been awarded to original staff still serving in the successor unit to Freikorps Epp, Reichswehr-Brigade 21.

    The medal has a facsimile signature of Ritter von Epp on the reverse. Little is known for sure about the ribbon. But, I believe this is the original ribbon for the medal.
    Attached Files

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