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Putting together an 80's era Panzergrenadier

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  • Albert
    replied
    Originally posted by Guardian 5 View Post
    Hi Gents,

    kration continues to make great strides and is looking for tips on field gear placement.

    It is my recollection that unlike the "gear queers" of the U.S. Army where devising combat versus sustainment load was somewhat of a fetish, the BW mechanized warrior was very much minimalist. A belt, "y" straps, and a couple of G3 mag pouches and that was it. Constantly mounting and dismounting from a Marder with anything more than the basic kit above was just asking for trouble.

    What say you Kelten Krieg Panzergrenadiere? I can't recall ever seeing a Greni with a canteen on his belt while many mechanized U.S. troops carried two.

    Thanks,
    TJ
    The problem with the BW canteen was that it's carrier was very impractical compared to its U.S. counterpart. While the U.S. canteen was carried in a cloth carrier which was attached to the belt by two clips that held it in place firmly and, most importantly, quietly, the German canteen was carried in a metal container that was attached to the belt by a single relatively loose strap. The BW canteen would dangle around and create noise. Furthermore, getting the U.S. canteen out of its carrier was easy and could be done quickly, this was not the case with the German canteen. Therefore, we most often carried the canteen (w/o the carrier) in the side pocket of the ruck.

    Yes, it was noted that the U.S. troops seemed to carry more, and always had their helmets on, but, at the same time their equipment was the object of our envy. We did believe that our boots were better though LOL. This was back in the late 80ies.

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  • ivbaust
    replied
    Here’s another photo from autumn 1989. It’s me during a break on the firing range. I’ve participated in the officer cadet course, which included the education to a tank commander on the armored tracked vehicle called “Marder”
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • ivbaust
    replied
    Originally posted by Proud Kraut View Post
    Nice "transition phase" picture. Looks like the soldier in the front row far right is wearing Flecktarn camo uniform already. These were the days...


    Yep, the comrade on the right came from a unit in Bavaria. They were equipped with the new stuff. Will search for more photos.

    Leave a comment:


  • Proud Kraut
    replied
    Nice "transition phase" picture. Looks like the soldier in the front row far right is wearing Flecktarn camo uniform already. These were the days...

    Leave a comment:


  • Guardian 5
    replied
    Super foto!

    Thanks,
    TJ

    Leave a comment:


  • ivbaust
    replied
    I’ve stumbled by accident over this thread and was immediately reminded of my service in the German Bundeswehr

    I was serving in a „Panzergrenadierkompanie“ in 88/89. I have been with my platoon on a military exercise when the Berlin Wall came down and the border between West and East Germany was opened.

    It was weird, strange, funny, fantastic, unbelievable! Really hard to describe! We practiced and of course the enemy was the „red army“. And suddenly the Iron Curtain didn’t exist anymore. Really strange!

    Here’s a photo from October or November 1989, I think. We’ve been exercising with our „Marder Schützenpanzer“ in Northern Germany. I’m the one with the “Panzerfaust“ and „G3“ rifle in the middle of the front row
    Attached Files

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  • Guardian 5
    replied
    Another.

    I would highly recommend the book, Modern German Panzergrenadiers by Michael Jerchel for detailed looks at Cold War era "West" German infantry in the field.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Guardian 5
    replied
    More gear pics.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Guardian 5
    replied
    Hi Gents,

    kration continues to make great strides and is looking for tips on field gear placement.

    It is my recollection that unlike the "gear queers" of the U.S. Army where devising combat versus sustainment load was somewhat of a fetish, the BW mechanized warrior was very much minimalist. A belt, "y" straps, and a couple of G3 mag pouches and that was it. Constantly mounting and dismounting from a Marder with anything more than the basic kit above was just asking for trouble.

    What say you Kelten Krieg Panzergrenadiere? I can't recall ever seeing a Greni with a canteen on his belt while many mechanized U.S. troops carried two.

    Thanks,
    TJ
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Ralph P
    replied
    Great thread to see what is in other collectors have in their collections.

    Leave a comment:


  • Albert
    replied
    Only one was issued, and, same as above, no memories of what condition it came in paint-wise. I also don't remember anyone actively removing the paint. I could very well imagine that it was done though, maybe even I did it and just can't remember now... Why was it done? Because the majority wanted to have that seasoned look, wearing, at least somewhat, faded uniforms and shoulder ranks. So a worn buckle would go with that image, a new fully painted one would not. If it was green or not was not really a concern for field exercises.

    With that said, some acquired a second belt to wear with their pants, instead of the black leather belt, ending up wearing two at the same time when the jacket was worn.

    Leave a comment:


  • Blacksmith Life
    replied
    Please indulge me

    In my years on WAF, I've never strayed to this part of the forum. I must say, this is an incredibly interesting thread. Thank you.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guardian 5
    replied
    Gentlemen,

    Very interesting information. Thanks very much for sharing. It seems that we are on to some new learning.

    Much obliged!

    All the best,
    TJ

    Leave a comment:


  • Dr Bison
    replied
    In my outfit we certainly didn't remove the paint either - it wore off the Koppel all by itself.

    But I can remember that there was a "Spieß" in the sister batallion, FschJgBtl. 253, who in the barracks wore a silver-plated belt buckle. Maybe it was just silver paint - I never asked him, being a lowly Gefreiter... That individual also prefered jackboots over the jump boots, which were polished to an unearthly shine.

    Leave a comment:


  • Collectinsteve
    replied
    Interesting! ProudKraut, I don't think I've ever seen one like that before. Now I know that if I do see it that someone soldier had it modified instead of it being like this from the factory.

    Dion, the paint came off very easily during use. I've had maybe two dozen of these belts and all of them (except one unissued one) had significant amounts of paint missing. Some only had the paint in the grooves and around the edges, with the rest worn off.

    Steve

    Leave a comment:

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