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New to researching British medals...where to start

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    New to researching British medals...where to start

    Back in March, I picked of a War Medal, minus the ribbon- a refugee from the melting pot i would guess. It is marked on the rim to a Pte J Stevenson 3-7483 Argyll and Sutherland highlanders. I know it's WWI, but does the serial style mean anything. I t doesn't look like the ones I've been seeing, either all number or letter/numbers. Not sure how the medal made it to a coin dealer in Ohio, but it did.
    Thanks ahead. I've looked a bit, but not found anything that matches up.
    CDW

    #2
    "Number prefixes were also used by some regiments to identify the particular battalion that a man served with. The 3/ and 4/ prefixes are common for Special Reserve and Extra Reserve recruits."

    http://armyservicenumbers.blogspot.c...-prefixes.html

    Comment


      #3
      A little more - the man's first name was James.

      He first arrived in France 27 December 1914 and was entitled to the Victory Medal, British War Medal and 1915 Star.

      He appears to have survived the war.

      Comment


        #4
        Hello CD


        You may want to become a member of the British Medal Forum.


        It will take a while to register as a new member but if you plan to collect British medals it will be well worth it.


        Here's the website:


        https://britishmedalforum.com


        Take some time to peruse the good advice for new members here:



        https://britishmedalforum.com/viewto...p?f=49&t=82203


        Kind regards,


        Paul

        Comment


          #5
          I'm amazed at your quick work! I've been searching at least a few hours a month and hadn't matched him up to a particular J Stevenson yet. I had found one in the Argyll who died, one whose family wasn't sure where he went after the War and a few others that didn't match the serial. The British record system is different than what I'm used to for U.S. genealogy, Civil War pensions and trying to find my great uncles units from WWII (tailgunner and an MP). I figured, rightly it seems, that I just didn't know where or how to look. Hats off to you and many thanks. I now have a name. So there could be two more medals out there to find. I will have to keep an eye out. Might i ask the magician his secrets? I'm curious as to what I didn't know to check. The research is the fun part for me.

          Comment


            #6
            Websites like ancestors.co.uk and findmypast.co.uk will hold the medal cards for British army soldiers from ww1! If your lucky his service records will have survived (most of them were burned in the blitz). These sites you will need to pay for!Though they can well be worth it as it might contain other family information to!

            Comment


              #7
              Thanks for the link, Paul. I think I will join. I have only become more active in my collecting lately. As a kid, I collected all manner of items from junk boxes and flea markets (still do, as it bothers me to see them treated that way- my father was USAF in Vietnam, two great-uncles in WWII, and a GGuncle who was in the Spanish American war and a POW in WWII since he was still living in the Philippines, they once meant something to someone). I've picked up several Canadian cap badges lately and three I think are British just this past Saturday. I haven't taken a good look yet. We are installing all new windows, etc., and life is a bit hectic. One might be Herfordshire. They are each mounted to a display board and were marked "military awards" at about $3 each. I do have the Gaylor book, but it's in storage til we finish renovations.
              The War Medal was missing it's ribbon, though the hanger is intact, if bent. I suspect it was sold as scrap silver. I "rescued" it from a coin dealer and paid the scrap price for it. I think it would be nice to see it reribboned, if I can. It would be dream to restore the trio, since the Star is probably gone. I will look though.
              Im an Anglophile/Commonwealth lover. As a model builder, I have an inordinate love of the Spitfire. I've built or have to build Spitfires in 1/24 to 1/144, including over 2 dozen in 1/72.

              Comment


                #8
                I would suggest two vital reference books: "British Battles and Medals", published by Spink and now in it's 7th edition, and the annually published "Medal Yearbook", so important for checking current values.
                There are, of course, many, many other reference books available, depending upon your collecting focus.
                I would echo the suggestion to join the British Medal Forum.

                Bob Shoaf

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by CD Wells View Post
                  I'm amazed at your quick work! I've been searching at least a few hours a month and hadn't matched him up to a particular J Stevenson yet. I had found one in the Argyll who died, one whose family wasn't sure where he went after the War and a few others that didn't match the serial. The British record system is different than what I'm used to for U.S. genealogy, Civil War pensions and trying to find my great uncles units from WWII (tailgunner and an MP). I figured, rightly it seems, that I just didn't know where or how to look. Hats off to you and many thanks. I now have a name. So there could be two more medals out there to find. I will have to keep an eye out. Might i ask the magician his secrets? I'm curious as to what I didn't know to check. The research is the fun part for me.
                  A magician never reveals his secrets !

                  However, I’m not a magician.

                  The first thing I did was check the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website to see if he was a casualty using WW1, J Stevenson and Argylls as search terms.

                  https://www.cwgc.org/find/find-war-d...hlanders&war=1

                  The website on Service Numbers is a good resource which I had used before.

                  As paddywhack correctly pointed out, I used Ancestry UK to find his Medal Index Card which gave me the information I provided.

                  Unfortunately his service record does not appear to be one that survived.

                  His name is quite common so it is difficult to find more without a lot of work.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Hi CDW

                    according to the Armed Forces Records, there were at least 10 J. Stevensons' serving in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders during WW1. I can have a closer look later on, when I get back from work.

                    regards

                    macleod

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Hi CDW,

                      see below. It does not say that this J Stevenson was in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, but his service number is 7483. As a presbyterian, there is a good chance he is Scottish...

                      regards

                      macleod


                      First Name:
                      J
                      Surname:
                      Stevenson
                      Age:
                      33
                      Index Number of Admission:
                      15284
                      Rank:
                      Private
                      Service Number:
                      7483
                      Years Service:
                      1 year
                      Months With Field Force:
                      8 months
                      Ailment:
                      Dental caries
                      Date Discharged Back to Duty:
                      08/08/1915
                      Date of Transfer From Other Hospitals:
                      03/08/1915
                      Notes written in the Observations Column:
                      To Base Depot Rouen
                      Religion:
                      Presbyterian
                      Archive Reference:
                      MH106/1412 MH106/1412 can be found at The National Archives in Kew, and contains First World War Representative Medical Records of No. 4 Stationary Hospital: 28/07/1915 to 04/08/1915. British and Colonial Other Ranks. No. 4 Stationary Hospital at ARQUES. Ser: 203-209. Transfers 14700-15382b.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Nice research! So, a 33 year old who joins up in 1914, gets to France but is sent home a year later because of bad teeth. And they must have been awful, to get him a discharge in 1915! But, presumably, he survived the war.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Also worth reading this pinned thread: http://www.wehrmacht-awards.com/foru...ad.php?t=13663

                          Regards,

                          Des
                          Regards,

                          Des

                          Comment

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