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    Chernobyl - 2019 TV Series

    Surprised no one has started a thread about this one yet, the TV Series 'Chernobyl' on sky tv.



    This is well worth checking out in my view. A high quality telling of the story which doesn't talk down to it's audience.

    I thought they way the handled the mechanics of why the incident happened was well thought out, lots of technical information is presented in a way you can follow.

    There were many stand out moments in this series, practical events that you wouldn't have thought about but which make perfect sense when you see it all laid out here. The animal clearance crews, miners, firefighters etc. The ego-ism and career ism of the admin and scientists and also the subtle background menace of the kgb - these are all well displayed. The graphic detail of the hospital scenes and how they played out was also memorable.

    On a side note I saw some real life footage of the roof clearance and it very closely matches what was shown in the series;

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ti-WdTF2Qr8

    so I get the feeling they went to great lengths to achieve visual authenticity. There were reports on rt.com which interviewed some of the actual personel who nitpicked the odd detail but the gist was they were also pleased it was treated in a mature sensible manner. I'd be interested to hear others thoughts on this. I remember the incident occurring and the radiation cloud spreading over Europe but I never knew the technical side of why it happened so for me this was informative as well as entertaining. This also contained one of the most terrifying scenes in modern tv (imo) where the 3 'volunteers' with torches descend into the waters to try to shut down a valve during the early days of the event.

    Here is a sample review;

    https://www.independent.ie/entertain...-38091115.html


    Pat Stacey
    May 8 2019 8:31 AM



    HBO and Sky’s five-hour miniseries about the world’s worst nuclear power plant disaster comes with the usual coda. Some names have been changed, and some events and characters fictionalised, modified or composited for dramatic purposes.
    Yet no piece of dramatised non-fiction has ever felt this authentic. The No 4 reactor at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant exploded on April 26, 1986, during a late-night safety test simulating a power failure.
    The miniseries opens two years after the catastrophe. Physicist Valery Legasov (Jared Harris), the man who led the commission that investigated the accident, has just finished dictating into a tape recorder his account of the incompetence that caused the explosion and the shocking official cover-up that followed.
    Slipping out of his modest apartment and past the KGB man sitting in a parked car across the street, Legasov stashes the cassette tapes, which would eventually reach the outside world, behind a grill in an alleyway. Then he returns home, and having fed his cat, smoked a cigarette and put on his overcoat, hangs himself.

    We’re immediately transported back two years to the night of the disaster. In an even more modest apartment in the town of Pripyat, pregnant young wife Lyudmilla Ignatenko (Irish actress Jessie Buckley) is returning to bed after a trip to the bathroom when she hears a loud bang and the building is shaken by the force of an explosion at the Chernobyl plant, three kilometres away.
    Her husband Vasily (Adam Nagaitis), a fireman, is roused from his sleep and one of the first responders on the scene. He’ll also be one of the first to die a slow, agonising death from radiation poisoning.

    When he arrives to battle the inferno, however, the awful reality of what’s just happened hasn’t yet registered. It soon does, though.
    One of Vasily’s colleagues picks up a lump of debris, without realising what he’s handling. It twinkles like granite, but it’s actually a piece of radioactive graphite. Within minutes, he’s peeling off his heavy fireman’s glove to reveal a bleeding, blistered hand that looks like it’s been pressed against a scalding hotplate.
    Inside the plant, the lies, deception and denials begin within moments of the explosion.
    Chernobyl’s deputy chief engineer Anatoly Dyatlov (Paul Ritter), who supervised the disastrous safety test, refuses to believe (or pretends not to believe) the evidence of a junior colleague’s eyes, that it’s the reactor core, and not merely a tank, that has exploded.
    He continually orders men to descend into the bowels of the plant to open valves and turn on water pipes to a core that no longer exists.
    Even as they return, blistered and bleeding and vomiting because of radiation levels so high that they max out the measuring instruments, Dyatlov still refuses to acknowledge the truth — until he too falls ill.
    Meanwhile, safely ensconced in a nuclear bunker, the plant’s manager Viktor Bryukhanov (Con O’Neill) and a group of cowardly fellow bureaucrats engage in a damage-limitation exercise. One official, the only sane voice in the room, urges evacuating Pripyat (“The air is glowing!”). Instead they take the decision to seal it off, trapping the residents and cutting the telephone lines in order to “prevent the spread of misinformation”.

    In Pripyat, the unwitting locals stand on a bridge, transfixed by the ethereal light (caused by radioactive particles in the atmosphere) in the distance, while children lark around in the gathering pile of toxic ash, as though playing in the sand at a beach.
    Writer Craig Mazin, best known before now for writing the comedy The Hangover and its sequels, and director Johan Renck have crafted an unflinching, devastatingly powerful drama with the tautness of a thriller and the chilling veracity of a documentary.
    The fact that the large cast —including Emily Watson, Stellan Skarsgard and Ireland’s Barry Keoghan in later episodes — avoid fake Russian accents adds to the realism.
    Chernobyl, Sky Atlantic
    Area of collecting interest - Polizei Photographs.

    http://www.militaria-archive.com/

    #2
    Originally posted by Mil-Archive View Post
    Surprised no one has started a thread about this one yet, the TV Series 'Chernobyl' on sky tv.
    I'm not! It was/is a purely civilian matter. It looks good (I've recorded it) but it is not military.

    Comment


      #3
      In terms of Cold War history it's got a relevance, some point to the event and aftermath as the start of the downfall of the Soviet Union. So geo politically and Cold war wise it's relevant imo. Also there was a military aspect in that vast numbers of men and equipment were dragged in to try and fix it (along with miners and non military personnel). Anyway I think in recent years there have been a couple of stand out 'mature' historical dramas and this one is up there with the best of them, despite the usual nitpicking (one of the characters is an amalgam who didn't actually exsist and some events are rolled into one etc).
      Area of collecting interest - Polizei Photographs.

      http://www.militaria-archive.com/

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Mil-Archive View Post
        In terms of Cold War history it's got a relevance, some point to the event and aftermath as the start of the downfall of the Soviet Union. So geo politically and Cold war wise it's relevant imo. Also there was a military aspect in that vast numbers of men and equipment were dragged in to try and fix it (along with miners and non military personnel).
        It probably has I suppose, as I say I have recorded it (or downloaded whatever!) and look forward to watching it. I suppose I am just inclined not to see such recent events as 'history' when I was 'there' at the time (in West Germany) in '86, to me history occurred before I was born!

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Seigfried View Post
          I'm not! It was/is a purely civilian matter. It looks good (I've recorded it) but it is not military.
          The clean-up was undertaken by Soviet troops, so there is a military aspect to it. I was very impressed by the show. I found it very chilling when Gorbachev was briefed on the dire situation and how it was likely to cause a nuclear holocaust upon much of Ukraine in a matter of 36 hours (something like that!) unless the water tanks were emptied. Thereafter, asking for volunteers for, basically, a one-way mission.....amazing and very moving. Those volunteers should have been named "Hero of the Soviet Union", at the very least.
          When you go home
          Tell them for us and say
          For your tomorrow
          We gave our today

          --Inscription in the 5th Marine Division cemetery,
          Iwo Jima 1945

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by WalterB View Post
            The clean-up was undertaken by Soviet troops, so there is a military aspect to it. I was very impressed by the show. I found it very chilling when Gorbachev was briefed on the dire situation and how it was likely to cause a nuclear holocaust upon much of Ukraine in a matter of 36 hours (something like that!) unless the water tanks were emptied. Thereafter, asking for volunteers for, basically, a one-way mission.....amazing and very moving. Those volunteers should have been named "Hero of the Soviet Union", at the very least.
            I agree but if we have flooding etc in the UK, the Army is called out to assist (MACA: Military Aid to Civilian Authorities) - it is of no military significance to us, just another sh!t job.

            Those volunteers that dealt with it definitely deserve recognition for averting a catastrophe.

            Comment


              #7
              Thought this series was brilliantly done.

              The only show I've been fully glued to from start to finish in a long time - seemed to feel worse knowing what was going to happen.

              I can't find the link, but there's a great independent Russian journalist write-up of how the show is perceived in Russia (not well). It also interestingly pointed out, that the HBO series did more to honor those who sacrificed in the recovery than anything else in Russia has...
              ------------------------------------------------
              Collector of French ww2-era insignia.

              Comment


                #8
                Do Russian characters speak Russian?

                Comment


                  #9
                  Hi,

                  Russia will produce his own TV-serie, which will show what the "truth" story of the Tchernobyl disaster was... And guess what, yes, it was due to an US spy who sabotaged the nuclear plant !

                  It is outrageous to the memory of the hundred of thousand of civilians who died or are still dying/sick due to the disaster.

                  https://screencrush.com/russian-tv-v...-of-chernobyl/

                  A Russian TV Station Is Making Its Own ‘Chernobyl’ Where Americans Are the Villains
                  ScreenCrush Staff
                  June 6, 2019


                  Interest in Chernobyl has skyrocketed since the airing of the surprise hit HBO miniseries about the infamous nuclear disaster. (Reuters reports a “a 40% rise in [tour] trip bookings since the series.” But not everyone is happy about the increase in attention. The Moscow Times reports that general reaction to the series in Russia has been heavily negative, with some in the media claiming it was designed “to tarnish this country’s image as a nuclear power” and that the show presents “a caricature and not the truth.”

                  To counteract that “caricature,” one Russian TV station is prepping a response: Its own Chernobyl series with a somewhat different account of what went wrong. On NTV’s version, it will be revealed that “the CIA sent an agent to the Chernobyl zone to carry out acts of sabotage.”

                  More, from The Moscow Times:

                  As justification for the story, the film’s director, Alexei Muradov, cited fringe conspiracy theorists: ‘One theory holds that Americans had infiltrated the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and many historians do not deny that, on the day of the explosion, an agent of the enemy’s intelligence services was present at the station.’

                  Meanwhile, Chernobyl remains the top-rated TV series in history on IMDb. So maybe they don’t have a lot of Russian users?


                  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  See You

                  Vince

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I'm sure there is some wacky nonsense on American tv also. This seems to be a more balanced article which touches on the public reaction in Russia:

                    https://www.afp.com/en/news/15/chern...ia-doc-1ha62l1

                    A US-made television series on the Chernobyl nuclear disaster was well-received by Russian audiences, even if some critics accused the makers of distorting the facts to show the Soviet-era authorities in a particularly bad light.
                    Entitled simply "Chernobyl", the hard-hitting five-part HBO and Sky series received the thumbs-up from critics when it was broadcast in the United States and Britain starting from last month for its graphic recreation of the 1986 nuclear disaster in Soviet-era Ukraine.
                    It was not shown on terrestrial TV in Russia, but was legally available via the Amediateka streaming site, which gained the exclusive Russian rights to popular series such as "Game of Thrones".
                    Russian audiences praised the series for what they said was its eerie accuracy.
                    "The degree of realism in Chernobyl is higher than in most Russian films about that era," wrote pro-Kremlin daily Izvestia.
                    "I think this is a very high-quality product in terms of television series, there's nothing to find fault with," Susanna Alperina, film and television critic for Rossiiskaya Gazeta daily, told AFP.

                    -Propaganda

                    But some Russian media described the series as "propaganda" that exaggerated the callousness of the authorities at the time, their slowness in reacting and the long time they took to officially acknowledge the accident and evacuate the area.
                    Starring British actor Jared Harris as deputy head of the USSR's main nuclear research centre and directed by Sweden's Johan Renck, "Chernobyl" delivers a hard-hitting account of the accident at the fourth reactor of the nuclear station that sent radioactive fallout over much of Europe.
                    The world's worst nuclear accident happened on April 26, 1986. Thirty people were killed in the explosion or died soon after from radiation exposure and thousands have since died of related illnesses, though the exact figure remains disputed.
                    Authorities say it will only be safe for humans to live in Chernobyl again in 24,000 years.
                    Filmed both in Ukraine and at a decommissioned nuclear power station in ex-Soviet Lithuania that resembles the doomed plant, the TV series was, for many of its Russian viewers, an emotional experience.
                    It reawakened childhood memories and focussed on the heroism of ordinary citizens, while top officials -- including the then Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev -- were depicted as indecisive and mendacious.
                    The show was made "with such respect and sympathy for people, our Soviet people... And with such contempt for the authorities who despised their citizens", Ksenia Larina, a presenter on Echo of Moscow popular radio station, wrote on Facebook.
                    - 'Excellently filmed lie' -
                    However, others slammed not only what they felt was unjustified criticism of the Soviet regime, but also a sly dig at present-day authorities.
                    The series shows "careerists from the Politburo saving their skins at the price of the lives of abject and enslaved people", wrote Komsomolskaya Pravda tabloid, referring to the Soviet Communist Party's ruling organ.
                    It also aimed to foment protests against Russia's current projects to build power plants abroad, the newspaper claimed.
                    The show is an "excellently filmed lie," wrote Argumenty i Fakty newspaper, complaining it depicts the Soviet people as "bloody executioners or helpless victims."
                    But Rossiiskaya Gazeta's TV critic, Alperina, dismissed such accusations.
                    "I don't think there are elements of propaganda in the series," she said. "Sometimes, an outsider's view is truer."

                    The show has prompted soul-searching over why Russia has never made any comparable series of its own, although several shows and films have touched on the nuclear disaster.
                    "We don't have anything that is equal to 'Chernobyl'," Alperina said.

                    This may be partly because the budgets of Russian television shows are "nothing compared to Western ones," she said.
                    "Maybe people are afraid to do such a project, fearing that the viewers won't like it. In fact, our viewers are waiting for such a series."
                    In 2014, youth channel TNT aired a teen drama series called "Chernobyl. The Exclusion Zone," set in the disaster zone and including elements of horror.
                    Russian actor and director Danila Kozlovsky in March announced plans to make a film about Chernobyl that he will star in.
                    Or here is another, an interview with one of the real life characters featured in the tv-series :

                    https://www.rt.com/news/461348-chern...tarakanov-hbo/
                    Area of collecting interest - Polizei Photographs.

                    http://www.militaria-archive.com/

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by pasoleati View Post
                      Do Russian characters speak Russian?
                      No, its English language for all characters, no attempts at accents either. The casting and actors are all very good, no weak links there. I didn't find the language a factor that went against it to be honest. The way the story is put together in terms of pacing and 'realism' set design, cinematography & production values was enough to carry it. If you get a chance I'd recommend checking it out.
                      Area of collecting interest - Polizei Photographs.

                      http://www.militaria-archive.com/

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Vince, please do not propagate the very false claim that "hundreds of thousands" being sick due to the accident. It is based on worst kind of anti-nuclear power propaganda. Has no scientific hard evidence whatsoever.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Hi,

                          pasoleati, to deny facts due to lack of concrete data (because the Soviet Union was a dictatorship which was leaded by incompetents) and because of that still promote nuclear energy (the energy of our fathers) in 2019 truly amaze me.

                          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deaths...nobyl_disaster

                          If you prefer to accept the official death count of 31 deaths, it is up to you.

                          I will let you happily troll this topic as you did with other similar ones, as your presence on the WAF is only limited to such "contributions"...

                          See You

                          Vince

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Unbelievable. Someone cites Wikipedia as a supposedly reliable source on this. I do really suggest that you actually study facts. For example, the radiation dosage of great many of those who claim to be sick due to Chernobyl are actually lower than the radiation dosage great many Finns receive annually in their houses due to the radioactive radon gas emanating from the ground. It has been measured that due to the aforementioned radon gas, many nuclear plant employees have higher radioactivity at home than what is the maximum allowed level at the reactor room of the plant.

                            What is more, if the anti-nuclear propagandists had been right and low-intensity exposure had a significant impact on health, we would be extinct by now as uranium has been a part of Earth's crust for longer than humans have existed.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by pasoleati View Post
                              Unbelievable. Someone cites Wikipedia as a supposedly reliable source on this. I do really suggest that you actually study facts. For example, the radiation dosage of great many of those who claim to be sick due to Chernobyl are actually lower than the radiation dosage great many Finns receive annually in their houses due to the radioactive radon gas emanating from the ground. It has been measured that due to the aforementioned radon gas, many nuclear plant employees have higher radioactivity at home than what is the maximum allowed level at the reactor room of the plant.

                              What is more, if the anti-nuclear propagandists had been right and low-intensity exposure had a significant impact on health, we would be extinct by now as uranium has been a part of Earth's crust for longer than humans have existed.
                              So the whole Exclusion Zone is just a fabrication?
                              When you go home
                              Tell them for us and say
                              For your tomorrow
                              We gave our today

                              --Inscription in the 5th Marine Division cemetery,
                              Iwo Jima 1945

                              Comment

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