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Velvet with Foam Backing

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    Velvet with Foam Backing

    I have had this case for about 20 years and I was just opening it to see about resetting a medal display (I’ve used it for various things and have not had anything in it consistently for more than a few years). I was surprised to see that the velvet matting is essentially breaking down. It basically falls apart as I touch it; the velvet and especially the foam. This is the exact same type of padding in the Ruddles Mills cases. I have a number of them and am working on a new display of various groups. That said, this makes me a very nervous about long term storage of medals in them.

    I'm thinking that an acrylic felt is a better option that I can put over the padding in this cases. It's a better alternative to the velvet/foam and will protect from the medals from the padding. Is anyone else seeing this?

    IMG_9300 (1).jpg
    sigpicIron Cross Award Documents of World War II - Out Now!

    info@kleinekillpress.com
    www.kleinekillpress.com

    #2
    2 IMG_9301 (1).jpg
    sigpicIron Cross Award Documents of World War II - Out Now!

    info@kleinekillpress.com
    www.kleinekillpress.com

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      #3
      Had the same problem. Had not cheeeecked the display case in quite a while as it was in the back of a closetT. he foam had broken down and stuck to a couple of bayonet scabbards. I was able to clean them up and remove the residue. I believe Ron Weinand posted an SS dagger that had rusted from contact with the foam. Made me check and found the bayonets.

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        #4
        I would suggest, if this were mine, I would remove and clean all of the debris out.
        Go to Michael's and purchase some archival safe foam, (they have it in a couple of different thicknesses), use spray glue if you want to do so, and reline it.
        I do not glue my foam in, but rather I cut the covering material, (I often use plain wool), a little larger and "tuck" it in all of the way around. This way, I am using the pressure of the foam and wool to press the items against the glass.
        Hope you can use some, or all of the information.
        Ralph.
        Searching for anything relating to, Anton Boos, 934 Stm./Pz.Erz.Abt. 7, 3 Kompanie, Panzer-Regiment 2, 16th Panzer-Division (My father)

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          #5
          yep, this is all good info.. The problem with the existing stuff is that the foam is part of the velvet so the militaria is essentially in contact with it. So, yeah, I will use wool or acrylic felt as a barrier on top of the larger foam (not the disintegrating junk that is part of the velvet). I like your wool idea - another friend mentioned it too.

          And, Steiner, you are right. The disintegrating foam will actually stick to stuff. I can see how it ruined some daggers. Nasty stuff.
          sigpicIron Cross Award Documents of World War II - Out Now!

          info@kleinekillpress.com
          www.kleinekillpress.com

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            #6
            I never use any of the velvet with the foam backing. Most of those materials look good initially (to attract collectors with ready-made display cases and materials), but are ultimately cheap and dangerous for collections. I only use inert, archival materials that do not break down and do not emit gases as they deteriorate. None of that is ever good for for militaria - or anything else for that matter. Fleece is another excellent option. It is readily available, inexpensive, archival, and does not emit gases; it is what I mostly use in display cases. I also sometimes use muslin, but being made of cotton, it can attract moisture - as any absorbent material can. If the humidity in your collection environment is stable and controlled (as it should be), the pure, unbleached muslin is a fine choice. I've never had trouble with any of those materials in decades of actual use. Since what we collect is so expensive, it is always well worth it to do the research, know what display materials may do to your collection over time, and pay a little extra for archival materials. There is little worse than opening up a display case to find a surprise that could have been avoided and damage that can never be undone.

            P.S. Aside from the obvious choice of archival materials, again, humidity control is, obviously, of major importance. I keep my collection in a controlled environment (using a dehumidifier and hygrometer to monitor humidity). The condensation formed by fluctuations in humidity, as well as humidity that is generally too high, is a real collection killer for sure. Yes, I have digressed a bit with the humidity, but it's a good thing to remember, along with the material you put in your display cases. And don't forget the moth and carpet beetle larvae!

            Chris
            "Since so much comes out of the woodwork, I'm considering a second career in carpentry."--Stahlhelm

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