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Old 12-13-2015, 08:48 AM   #61
macleod
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Hi,

I received my copy last week and finally had the time to look through it today. As expected, Totenkopf is up to Mark's usual high standard. There is a lot of information in this volume and many interesting photos to accompany the text. Fantastic!

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Old 12-13-2015, 09:56 AM   #62
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I got my copy three days ago, first book lost in the mail. ( Rare occurance to be honest , but helion replaced it without question or delay ).

Mark's book.
Helion have done a great production job on it , really high standard.
The larger size certainly was a good decision and does the work , paper quality is excellent, font size matches book size , although I waer reading glasses the font is clear and user friendly and paragraphs are well laid out.
Photos are utterly amazing, vast majority are new and the publisher has ensure their reproduction is clear and they surrender detail easily.
The book is expensive but when you look at the quality of production you can appreciate you are geetting value for money.
The presentation of dust jacket is similar to that of mark's DK series, but the dust jacket photos are not embossed on books hard cover - his said the actual structure of the book is strong and is very well presented , Helion have done a very very good job.
Content wise , I have not read a book on TK since "Soldiers of Destruction" which was way back in the 1970's , I was about 18-19 then , so a decent updated history is long over due and here it is.
I would claim no expertise on the division , I bought the book to learn and to continue with mark's DK coverage.
I have leafed over the DK section , same approach as per RJB publication and it works just as well - easy to follow easy to read informative and detailed information which flow well and engages the reader.
This is a book which you can easily spend time with - the biography section of divisional commanders will be a great reead in itself .

As sod's law will have it I am to to have quite an extensive course of Chemotherapy starting next month so I am saving Mark's books as a companion read when I am having "IV's".

Mark and Ignacio have really achieved a gret success with this study and although I still have the book to read in depth doing so will be no hard task it simply invites you in and being with the book is no serious problem, like a good friend you will feel comfortabel with it and turning pages will not be a chore.

Some folks might think , God "too much money for a book" , a false ecomony in the long run , if you want a moderate night out on the town you will spend more and have less, it is relative to what you get and for what you get it is simply money well spent.

Some might say " sure google is cheaper". Yes "Google" is cheaper but "google is full of crap" would be my naser, call me old fashioned but the internet is what it is in terms of information and at best it is simply unreliable when it comes to standards of research and authorship - I would much rather buy a decent book written by a good serious author anything else is a waste of time.
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Old 12-13-2015, 12:53 PM   #63
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I expect this will sell well without much difficulty. My own book from Helion, at the same price, came out two months ago and has almost sold out its first printing already. So, fans of the topic aren't hesitating to open their wallets.

I'll be getting a copy of this Totenkopf book asap once it lands in the USA.
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Mark Yergers "Totenkopf" vol. I
Old 12-13-2015, 07:21 PM   #64
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Default Mark Yergers "Totenkopf" vol. I

Having written several book dealing with the Eastern Front during WWII, my interest in the classic Waffen SS and German Army divisions on the Eastern Front is considerable. One of the best known of the SS divisions, which was involved in many of the most famous battles in Russia, was the 3.SS-Panzer Division "Totenkopf." Starting with the first campaign in Russia, its enviable combat record, especially during defensive operations in the Demjansk pocket, was enhanced further by later offensive successes during the battles for Kharkov and Kursk. Army commanders of the period who had "Totenkopf" subordinated to their command universally spoke highly of the division, with Field Marshal von Manstein describing it as the best of the Waffen SS divisions.
 Mark C. Yerger is a prolific biographical researcher on the Waffen-SS with an earned reputation for presenting great detail and carefully researched factual works that are without bias. He has written on a number of specific topics, in great detail, that deal with the Waffen SS, its commanders and its personnel. His most recent book, the first of two on the “Totenkopf’ Division’s German Cross in Gold winners is what I consider his masterpiece.
Having read the first of two volumes I can say that he has reached new heights as a Waffen-SS historian. Although he has written about various topics on nearly all the classic Waffen-SS combat units since the 1980s, I doubt that he or anyone else, can exceed the amount of detailed information found in his “Totenkopf” books.
 After a substantial introduction, a "Commanders and Award Holders" chapter details the parameters of this comprehensive study, and provides a format for the study of the personalities, organization and history of the division as well as a large amount of related information.
One of the more interesting topics in this study is a history of the four prewar units of the Totenkopfverbände, which were combined along with support troop units, staff and command personnel and logistical troops to create the division in 1939, which is also provided.
 There is a section describing the early concentration camps under first division commander, Theodore Eicke and the development of the system up until the division was organized as a combat formation. However, the book is about the "Totenkopf" Division as a combat unit that fought on the Eastern Front from 1941 to the end of the war. It was never withdrawn for rebuilds like the other “classic” Waffen SS divisions, such as “Das Reich,” “Leibstandarte,” and “Wiking.” Therefore it remained on the front for the duration and thus was never involved as a unit in the camp system, essentially after its build up to a combat unit which began in 1939. Anyone interested in Holocaust topics will need to look elsewhere, although sources for additional reading are provided.
 There is a short chapter that shows uniquely rare surviving artifacts of these pre-war units combined with period pictures that show extremely rare items. There is a summary of the division's combat operations, including an analysis of its losses during various periods, and a review of the divisional Knight's Cross recipients during the periods discussed.
 Yerger has greatly expanded the amount of Combat Elements coverage from the amount of information found in the earlier books of the German Cross series. A 100 page section describes operations of the 13 fighting components of the division. Also included is career information for all commanders, First Staff (1a) officers, and “Totenkopf” Knight's Cross holders. There are also extremely clear images and descriptive captions that show surviving award documents. Finding reproductions of these documents or the tremendously rare originals for this many men of a division is a research triumph that only those who have studied thousands of pages of German records can even begin to appreciate.
 However, the main body of the book is devoted to the first half of "Totenkopf" men awarded the German Cross in Gold, which includes all available surviving award texts including those of Enlisted and NCO ranks which are the most unbelievably difficult documents to find. Volume I concludes with a list of Single-handed Tank Destruction Award recipients and there is a documents section which describes the procedure involved in granting awards and shows a number of examples.
 While the text is the heart of the book, there is an incredible collection of largely unpublished images, which have long, informative captions, and a significant number are very clearly reproduced. There are many pictures of personnel that I've had knowledge of for years but had never seen pictures of. Along with a bibliography, and glossary, Yerger has included a name index that is essential for the 600+ men included.
 This work and the following volume II are extremely highly recommended to anyone who is interested in this well known division and its personnel.

George M. Nipe, Jr


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Old 12-15-2015, 01:02 AM   #65
Mark C. Yerger
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My deepest thanks for the kind commentary about the first volume of "Totenkopf." I apologize to the dozen or more forum members from the US who sent very kind PM notes or emails about the book as well as emails and PMs via other forms from people in the US and Europe that I have received but, untypically for me, have not replied due to issues with my hands. So the hours that I can type are totally devoted to incorporating Ignacio's thoughts and research "brain data" into English for volume III and designing his layout. To write this I use a Dragon verbal program so my fingers don't have to touch the keyboard.

In several ways "Totenkopf" is unique compared to other volumes I've done in the past twenty years from among the 20+ total I've compiled. I sincerely appreciated that whatever my reputation is was reflected by Helion and Co wanting the entire project sight unseen. What the reader visually sees when they get the book is a result of what I frankly consider extreme and extraordinary efforts and skill by two people who never saw it in any form until it was completed. Duncan Rogers for allowing me to design it myself with all the efforts he invested to prepare for that task. And Kim McSweeney's incredible effort in reproducing my paper-only designed copy with a different PC system and programs that is literally perfect. She is a "Rock Star" in design and as far as I am concerned should be on the cover, along with being solely responsible for the photo quality the reader sees.

Having written every word and designed the layout of every page, I can say that those who actually read it (words) will find volume I significantly beyond the normally added level of detail incorporated into each progressive volume of the GC series. Hence the need for 7 more chapters than any volume or unit covered in the earlier study (2 of the 7 are in volume II). While I'd hoped others would follow the level of detail in the German Cross holder books for Knight's Cross recipients or GC holders of other branches/units, that hasn't happened other than some single person biographies that I wish more would do like those I did on Weidinger and Krag. So the details and proposals of "Totenkopf" Ritterkreuzträger are included even if not awarded a GC. Likewise all the service specifics of all combat component commanders rather than the initial commanders with the earlier series', aside from those that were part of its already lengthy parameters and data included beyond the specific title subject combined with other research.

Deeply appreciating the contribution efforts of many with images beyond my own 30 years of gathering, a reference book should involve actual research and presenting new factual data. If the photos were removed from "Totenkopf" and it was just the text and captions the new data and actual research effort would still be there. Unfortunately, that is too often not the case in many volumes of the superficial or redundant type. And I wanted to insure all possible was included in the trilogy of the last major unit I'll cover.

Desiring to learn myself as priority, I've always written books on subjects that were the first or different rather than ride the commercial bandwagon of the redundant or obviously lacking of time/effort/investment in actual new research effort or ideas. Doing so to the limit of my ability when written, all then "sells" though that is an irrelevant factor or motivator in what I do or why. I don't get paid a cent for the two divisional volumes of the "Totenkopf" trilogy. I signed over all royalties as a school graduation gift to the children of my long-time friend and colleague Ignacio with hopes he'll also do something nice for his beloved spouse. He'll do the same for them with royalties for his volume III covering the Totenkopfstandarten. I get all I want learning and writing it as well as having it in the Library of Congress.

I saw volumes I and II complete in my head before I started, as proofreader Ignacio getting gray hairs following me. Having finished volume II, now it's my turn to get gray(er). Incorporating Ignacio's "brain data" and exhaustive research into text, I'm currently finishing chapters on 2 of the 19 Totenkopfstandarten in volume III that total over a hundred pages of text and lengthy data captions. They could be a book by themselves. We following a similar simple drum beat; to learn and teach new information.

Best,
Mark C. Yerger
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Old 12-15-2015, 04:05 AM   #66
chrischa
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Hello.

Thanks for the book review, it has encouraged me buying more promptly than I probably was.

I hope the treatment goes well.

Have a good Christmas.

Chris.


Quote:
Originally Posted by behblc View Post
I got my copy three days ago, first book lost in the mail. ( Rare occurance to be honest , but helion replaced it without question or delay ).

Mark's book.
Helion have done a great production job on it , really high standard.
The larger size certainly was a good decision and does the work , paper quality is excellent, font size matches book size , although I waer reading glasses the font is clear and user friendly and paragraphs are well laid out.
Photos are utterly amazing, vast majority are new and the publisher has ensure their reproduction is clear and they surrender detail easily.
The book is expensive but when you look at the quality of production you can appreciate you are geetting value for money.
The presentation of dust jacket is similar to that of mark's DK series, but the dust jacket photos are not embossed on books hard cover - his said the actual structure of the book is strong and is very well presented , Helion have done a very very good job.
Content wise , I have not read a book on TK since "Soldiers of Destruction" which was way back in the 1970's , I was about 18-19 then , so a decent updated history is long over due and here it is.
I would claim no expertise on the division , I bought the book to learn and to continue with mark's DK coverage.
I have leafed over the DK section , same approach as per RJB publication and it works just as well - easy to follow easy to read informative and detailed information which flow well and engages the reader.
This is a book which you can easily spend time with - the biography section of divisional commanders will be a great reead in itself .

As sod's law will have it I am to to have quite an extensive course of Chemotherapy starting next month so I am saving Mark's books as a companion read when I am having "IV's".

Mark and Ignacio have really achieved a gret success with this study and although I still have the book to read in depth doing so will be no hard task it simply invites you in and being with the book is no serious problem, like a good friend you will feel comfortabel with it and turning pages will not be a chore.

Some folks might think , God "too much money for a book" , a false ecomony in the long run , if you want a moderate night out on the town you will spend more and have less, it is relative to what you get and for what you get it is simply money well spent.

Some might say " sure google is cheaper". Yes "Google" is cheaper but "google is full of crap" would be my naser, call me old fashioned but the internet is what it is in terms of information and at best it is simply unreliable when it comes to standards of research and authorship - I would much rather buy a decent book written by a good serious author anything else is a waste of time.
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Old 12-15-2015, 06:11 AM   #67
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I completely agree with the above positive comments about this book. It is an outstanding achievement by the author(s) and also the publisher (Helion). Documenting the history of this division is not an easy task. This first volume of three will fill an important void in the history of the Waffen-SS and the SS as a whole. This volume provides a good overview of the pre-war Totenkopfverbaende and then excellent coverage of the combat units of the war-time division, it's divisional commanders, first staff officers, German-Cross-in-Gold awardees and even a detailed list of those members of the division that were awarded the Single-Handed-Tank-Destruction Badge. The End Notes can in themselves be a separate volume due to the primary information contained.
I buy many books thru the year, many I regret buying, but this is the best book I have obtained for this year.
If one is interested in the SS, a good German divisional history, and bios on high combat award winners within the WWII German armed forces you must obtain this book.
Congratulations and thanks to Mark Yerger and Ignacio Arrondo and the publisher (Helion) in making this book available to the masses.
Whilst on the subject of the SS-Totenkopf, for those who read German it is very worthwhile obtaining a recently published book by Marten van Dijken titled "Die SS-Totenkopfverbaende Eine Dokementation Band I 1933-1937.
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Old 12-25-2015, 02:24 PM   #68
Mark C. Yerger
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Don't know if planned or not, but this final came to me from Helion Christmas Eve afternoon after I had sent some additional pages.

My favorite holiday gift.

360 parts perfect with no returns needed
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Old 12-25-2015, 02:38 PM   #69
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Got in my copy last night as a Christmas gift. Obviously I can only provide first impressions so far.

Good:
-very good value for money

-very thoroughly researched

Less than good:
-Layout only lukewarm at best; for some odd reason the person doing the design has adopted a single-column design. That is an utter mistake for for a large format book. Now the column width is around 7" wide while the ideal width for readability would be 2 - 3 inches, i.e. the ideal would in this case be a 3-column design. Helion made the very same mistake with Bloody Streets and nobody liked it.

-Mr. Yerger's prose would greatly benefit from a skilled editor as his prose is unfortunately no match for his research skills. An editor might be able to persuade Yerger to realize that convoluted sentence structures etc. are not the sign of solid scientific authorship.

-the author's fetish for quotation marks: is it really necessary to put Totenkopf, Wiking etc. in quotation marks while these words are italicized already...

-In this time and age it is usual to give some biographical information on the author/s within the book with even a photo of him/them. In this book nothing, especially on Arrondo. Do they fear showing their faces?

-Early in the book Yerger writes how he kept his discussions with Waffen-SS veterans strictly to "who, when, where historical questions". This begs two questions: 1. Why the constant need to emphasize that; does he fear something if he and the veterans talked about something else? 2. The list "who, where, when" omits thhe most important question of any historian, why. Why? Without "why" there can be no analysis.

All in all, a very good book.
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Old 12-26-2015, 02:54 PM   #70
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Also got it yesterday from my lovely wife.

Very good! Well done Mark. ( enjoyed reading about Dave).
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Old 12-30-2015, 11:21 PM   #71
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Regarding the comments by Pasoleati and my first impressions of them
1. have to disagree about the necessity for 2 inch narrow columns for reasons that should be obvious. Have not seen a lot of columns that are 2 inches in width.
2. Mark writes it as he sees it in his mind not in an attempt to achieve what someone else decides is "solid scientific authorship." If stylistic considerations are too much of a burden don't buy the book.
3. Regarding whether quotation marks are necessary. yes
4. Do the authors fear showing their faces. This is a ridiculous question.
5. Regarding why. Whatever the initial "why" was, the combat soldier's why quickly becomes whatever is necessary for him and his comrades to survive another day or another hour or another minute.

George M. Nipe, jr
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Old 12-31-2015, 03:50 AM   #72
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I think point five from pasoleati is quite valid. The 'why' (sorry for quotation marks) does contextulise the actions and behaviours of the individual. From my point of view it also adds the human element to the biograhies and also I enjoy reading anecdotal information.

I am working through the book and thoroughly enjoying it.
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Old 01-01-2016, 05:13 AM   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pasoleati View Post
Who is Timo's publisher?
It will be self-published and set to be released in April 2016.
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Old 01-01-2016, 10:18 AM   #74
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gkniep47 View Post
Regarding the comments by Pasoleati and my first impressions of them
1. have to disagree about the necessity for 2 inch narrow columns for reasons that should be obvious. Have not seen a lot of columns that are 2 inches in width.
2. Mark writes it as he sees it in his mind not in an attempt to achieve what someone else decides is "solid scientific authorship." If stylistic considerations are too much of a burden don't buy the book.
3. Regarding whether quotation marks are necessary. yes
4. Do the authors fear showing their faces. This is a ridiculous question.
5. Regarding why. Whatever the initial "why" was, the combat soldier's why quickly becomes whatever is necessary for him and his comrades to survive another day or another hour or another minute.

George M. Nipe, jr
Mr. Nipe:

1. I wrote that the optimal column width is 2 - 3 inches. That is a fact based on readability tests. For example, your very own "Blood, Steel and Myth" has a 2-column layout giving a column width much closer to the ideal. And take a look at After the Battle books. They have mostly 3-column layouts making them very quick readng despite their very dense text.

2. An attitude most pervert. Books exist solely because readers are willing to pay for them. I.e. they exist for readers. That you choose to ignore stylistic issues reeks of rank amateurism. E.g. professional peer reviews of books do not ignore stylistic issues.

3. No, they are not.

4. You obviously miss the point. Authors' background may be a very important factor in determining the reliability of his analyses. For example, in the book Yerger makes some comments on the combat skills of various officers without citing a source or giving an example. This raises the question that what is the author's expertize on the topic of e.g. staff work. Does he have general staff training? The reader cannot know, because no biograpical information on Yerger is given. On the other hand, e.g. Douglas Nash's book do not hide his U.S. Army background and staff training. This immediately gives the reader the impression that Doug nash has personal expertize on the topic.

5. That is a very simplistic approach to the issue of combat effectiveness. Any soldier in any army in any battle faces the same question of survival, yet we know that there are significant differences of combat performance between various units. And in analyzing this difference the question why becomes the ultimate question. And that is also the key difference between a historian and a chronicler.

The book's subtitle has the word "personalities", not personnel. Therefore the reader does have the reason to expect to learn about the personality of the soldiers of the division.

The lack of why is well apparent in e.g. the chapter for Theodor Eicke. One can read that Eicke was brutal etc., but not WHY he was brutal. Was he simply a sadist? An opportunity-makes-a-criminal? This is a major omission in a biography.

I have followed various discussions on books for some 15 years. Every time George Nipe has a book published, a laudatory review by Mark Yerger follows. Every time Mark Yerger has a new book published, a laudatory review by Nipe follows. Quid pro quo?
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Old 01-08-2016, 01:40 AM   #75
Mark C. Yerger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pasoleati View Post
Mr. Nipe:

1. I wrote that the optimal column width is 2 - 3 inches. That is a fact based on readability tests. For example, your very own "Blood, Steel and Myth" has a 2-column layout giving a column width much closer to the ideal. And take a look at After the Battle books. They have mostly 3-column layouts making them very quick readng despite their very dense text.

2. An attitude most pervert. Books exist solely because readers are willing to pay for them. I.e. they exist for readers. That you choose to ignore stylistic issues reeks of rank amateurism. E.g. professional peer reviews of books do not ignore stylistic issues.

3. No, they are not.

4. You obviously miss the point. Authors' background may be a very important factor in determining the reliability of his analyses. For example, in the book Yerger makes some comments on the combat skills of various officers without citing a source or giving an example. This raises the question that what is the author's expertize on the topic of e.g. staff work. Does he have general staff training? The reader cannot know, because no biograpical information on Yerger is given. On the other hand, e.g. Douglas Nash's book do not hide his U.S. Army background and staff training. This immediately gives the reader the impression that Doug nash has personal expertize on the topic.

5. That is a very simplistic approach to the issue of combat effectiveness. Any soldier in any army in any battle faces the same question of survival, yet we know that there are significant differences of combat performance between various units. And in analyzing this difference the question why becomes the ultimate question. And that is also the key difference between a historian and a chronicler.

The book's subtitle has the word "personalities", not personnel. Therefore the reader does have the reason to expect to learn about the personality of the soldiers of the division.

The lack of why is well apparent in e.g. the chapter for Theodor Eicke. One can read that Eicke was brutal etc., but not WHY he was brutal. Was he simply a sadist? An opportunity-makes-a-criminal? This is a major omission in a biography.

I have followed various discussions on books for some 15 years. Every time George Nipe has a book published, a laudatory review by Mark Yerger follows. Every time Mark Yerger has a new book published, a laudatory review by Nipe follows. Quid pro quo?
Perhaps the last comment is because others are not doing equal or superior research on the same subjects. So positive comment earned by those who take the effort, time, etc to do so.

Some readers do not buy all books, and having not done research themselves (or written superior books) are obviously lacking in valid opinion of specific works, research, or subjects. Opinions and statements about the research of Nipe's books, or any others I ever commented on, are valid if one know what has been published, the actual CORRECT research undertaken, etc.

As to prose, I will keep my own words as the facts, data, and intent that have been absorbed and appreciated for the past 20 books. To each their own, the research and data is the basis. Other complaints are per the individual though some always focus to find fault with anything. Such is life.

And writing proper titles as they should be, with quotes, will continue in this trilogy. But feel free to do otherwise in the books you write.

Best,
Mark C. Yerger

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