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Old 09-10-2015, 11:54 AM   #61
Funksammler
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Thanks guys, hopefully I can post another update before the weekend...

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Old 09-11-2015, 10:16 AM   #62
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Sometimes you wonder where all the time has gone. I have been working on the rear seats and I am still not where I want to be! The rear seat consists of a wooden box structure which sits on top of the floor hatch discussed last time. For this reason the rear seats have to be removable and yet they have to stay firmly in place when fitted. Unfortunately I have never been able to find enough photographs and information to work out all the details, so the seats had to be re-engineered based on the fragmented information.

The result looks like this:

 photo DSC07603_zpsijvkgsqs.jpg

I have left the two seats attached to eachother so that the whole structure remains firmly in place between to two wheel arches. If I ever find evidence that the two seats are separate, I can easily cut out the piece of wood that connects them. Metal brackets on the corners are designed to provent the seats from moving inwards in that case but from an engineering point of view it makes more sense if the seats remain connected.

On top of the seat boxes are the seat cushions. These can also be removed so that the space inside the seats can be accessed. A number of storage boxes were place inside the seats.

 photo DSC07601_zpsp7x8jzvo.jpg

I have been experimenting with the seat springs but this has not been a grreat success. The seats are higher at the front than at the back and I managed to replicate this shape with an asymetrical fixing of the seat springs. Unfortunately this put more stress on the wooden frame than it could handle and it started to crack. Back to the drawing board to see if I can build a stronger version. I will probably resort to fitting a piece of angle iron inside the seat frame. In any case I will have to rebuild them before I can get any further.

I guess this demonstrates why restoring a vehicle is such a slow process, sometimes to you take one steps forward, two steps back and you have to start again!

One thing causing a lot of delays is that I had to farm out all my welding, in some cases I am waiting for years to get bits repaired. I finally decided to invest in a MIG welder so I can hopefully do more of this myslef. So I am now teaching myself to weld finding all sorts of odd jobs around the house.

 photo DSC07605_zpsqholjp2v.jpg

Quite a lot of fun actually and I am slowly gaining in confidence. Hopefully with more practice over winter I will be ready for some important welding jobs on the Horch next spring!

regards,

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Old 09-11-2015, 10:26 AM   #63
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What a patience you have.....
But the result will be impeccable...
Looking forward!
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Old 09-27-2015, 01:02 PM   #64
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Another week of slow progress. Waiting for a number of parts before I can move on again so I spent some time on other projects. I progressed a bit with the rear seats, I made a metal subframe to mount the springs but I am still not quite happy with the current design, so I will probably amend it at some stage. In any case, this is what they look like at the moment:

 photo DSC07631_zps6jc2il4q.jpg

 photo DSC07633_zpspnujigtu.jpg

Other than that I spent some time on cleaning the engine to propare it for running. It has been gathering dust (and there is a lot of wood dust in my garage/workshop) so it needed a bit of vacuum cleaning. I never had vacuum cleaned an engine before!

After this, I reinstated the ignition system. The coils and leads are not yet RF screened, but at least I know that all the elements in the ignition system function properly, giving me an easier time to get the engine up and running....

 photo DSC07632_zpscsjbxqkq.jpg

The eagle-eyed observers will notice that there are some essential elements missing from the engine, between the air filters and the inlet manifold to be precise....

The inlet manifold is covered by pieces of blue cloth to keep the dust out. When I was cleaning the engine I noticed one piece of cloth was missing. I looked everywhere in the engine bay and under the car but it had vanished. That got me a bit worried as I do turn over the engine from time to time on the starter motor; could it have been sucked into the manifold? Better be safe than sorry so I lifted the manifold to check. Low and behold I found the cloth halfway sticking out of one of the inlet ports of the engine block, I got it just in time before it got entagled in the valve! The cloth pieces are now back in place safely secured with a tie-wrap!

Back to the missing bits, which are the carburettors of course. The Horch uses two carburettors: a Solex 30 BFL and 30 BFR (the L and R stand - not surprisingly - for Links and Rechts). The same type of carburettor that can be found on certain types of heavy motorcycles. The motorbike type (I can never remember which on it is; the L or the R...) is very sought after, so it took be a long time to find a decent one. Needless to say the carburettors I found were not fitted with the correct venturi's (barrels) and injectors so these had to be fabricated. Some other small parts are also specific to the Horch installation, so I am now waiting for the final bits to be finished so that the carburettors can be reassembled and fitted, fortunately I have a good friend who arranges all this for me. In any case, I can not wait to get the engine up and running!

The Kfz 17 unfortunately is also out of action at the moment. At the start of a recent run I feld one of the brakes lock up. I thought I freed it with some pumping of the brakes, but the problems persisted. When I pulled the brake drum off to check the brake lining fell to floor in bits. One bit had broken off, dislodging the other linings from the shoes. Fortunately no damage was done to the brake drum. I removed the brake shoes and togehter with the drum they are now send away to be relined.

 photo DSC07629_zps0obiawm8.jpg

Fun and games, as they say....

regards,

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Old 09-29-2015, 06:30 AM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Funksammler View Post
The oil filter is a replica outer shell in which modern filter cartridges can be placed. Originally the complete filter had to be replaced, now it can simply be opened up and the cartridge inside it can be replaced.
Hi, who sells these shells? I would be interested in one for my car. Or is it self made?
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Old 09-29-2015, 11:16 AM   #66
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I bought them many years ago from a restorer/dealer in Germany, I'm afraid I can't remember much more.

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Old 12-05-2015, 11:27 AM   #67
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For a long time, some missing key components prevented me from running the engine: the carburettors. The Horch uses two; one for each bank of the V8. The correct ones are Solex 30 BFL and BFR (with L and R standing for Links and Rechts).

The same carburettors (the BFR type) are also used on heavy motorcycles such as the Zündapp KS 750, so they are pretty sought after and difficult to find. It took me quite a while to find the L and R types and even than they were not quite 100%.

To be able to use the same carburettor on a relatively small 750cc engine and half a 3.5 litre V8 requires the use of different venturies and injectors, so these had to be made to measure before I could use the carburettors in the Horch. But at long last I received my revamped carbs:

 photo DSC07753_zpsbwqmbbbo.jpg

I had to make various fittings and fixings to mount the carburettors on the engine and after a few days work I test fitted everything. My engine was finally looking complete:

 photo DSC07754_zpsdgcloqxu.jpg

 photo DSC07755_zpshkoeffrp.jpg

In the previous weeks I had already fitted a distributor and coils that I knew were functional and I had rigged up the ignition via the wiring harnass to the ignition lock. I gave the distributor a good clean, especially the automatic advance system as this often gives problems in the Horch. I was able to check that I had sparks and set the timing roughly by eye so all I could hope for that the ignition system would function correctly.

On the fuel side, I gave the fuel pump a clean and connected up the fuel lines to the carburettors. At the moment I use a plastic can placed on the floor as a fuel tank, so I had to make sure the pump had enough suction to pump the additional height.

The carburettors are interconnected by the system of rods and swivels to the accelerator. Originally the chokes were interconnected by a cable (a spring closes the chokes as the cable tension is released. The chokes however have quite a high mechanical resistance, so I fabricated an interconnection rod instead of a cable for a more reliable synchronisation of the chokes. Here is an overview of the complete setup:

 photo DSC07758_zpsdaqpgfgo.jpg

The original approach would have been to first test the individual carburettors on my functioning engine, that way fault finding would be a bit easier. Before dismantling the carbs from the new engine, I thought I would just give it a try though and see what happened....

http://vid672.photobucket.com/albums...psvgjoegya.mp4

Much to my delight and surprise the engine sprung to life immediately and settled into a nice smooth idle. Wow, that doesn't happen often, something working first time....

Some little niggles had to be sorted: one of the carbs leaked quite a bit (also a common Horch problem I am told) so I had to do some tricks to the floater to stop it over filling. Also both chokes were working the wrong way around (pulling the choke cable closed the choke rather than opening it), so I had to rebuild the choke mechanisms on both carbs. With that sorted a bit more testing:

http://vid672.photobucket.com/albums...pstkgkv84n.mp4

I am now waiting for a correct fan-belt (I ordered the wrong length, I guess not everything goes smoothly). The fan and waterpump are not yet running, so I can not run the engine for too long in case I overheat it. Once the belt is fitted I should be able to adjust the carbutettors and ignition properly and sort any other niggles and hopefully have a perfectly running engine. Over time I will refit more original components (for example, the fuel lines were rigid brass lines rather than hoses) and hopefully refit the original shielded ignition. By next spring the car should be able to move under it's own power.

regards,

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Old 12-07-2015, 10:30 AM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Funksammler View Post

Much to my delight and surprise the engine sprung to life immediately and settled into a nice smooth idle. Wow, that doesn't happen often, something working first time....
Fantastic!!! I know that feeling when you first time hear the engine working sound after a long, long repairing...
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Old 02-07-2016, 05:36 AM   #69
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From Ebay, unusual woodwork, may provide details. Regards, R.

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Old 02-07-2016, 05:49 AM   #70
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Ouch! That must have hurt. It is a pre-war "Stutzachse" model, this had the bottom half of the body made of metal, the top half of wooden slats. Looks like it was destroyed by an internal explosion...

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Old 03-13-2016, 12:07 PM   #71
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Any update Funksammler?
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Old 03-13-2016, 12:37 PM   #72
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Not a lot of progress on the Horch over winter, it is still too cold for glueing and painting. I did a bit of engine tuning, I am quite happy now with how she is running but I need her on her wheels to judge the torque from the engine. I have sourced some more parts in preparation for the spring season so I will probably start again next month or so when temperatures hit the mid teens. I am currently still working on a winter "indoor" project which I will hope to report on in a few weeks time.

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Old 03-14-2016, 12:13 AM   #73
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Good call on the blue rag going missing. A friend had just installed a freshly built 327 into his 69 SS Camaro. A .060 over 327 that had 12.5:1 pistons, a reverse rotation roller cam and rev kit, etc etc, he called me and asked how he could keep the valves closed to change the valve springs with no compressed air available. I said take out the spark plug for a given cylinder and stuff some rope in, then by hand, rotate the crank till the valve doesn't try to move when compressing the spring. He said thanks and hung up. I went over a few hours later in time to see a huge cloud of steam coming from the garage, a pissed off couple of friends, and more fresh steam pouring out one of the headers.

They had gotten the rope stuck in one cylinder trying to remove it, and had actually bumped the starter a few times to try to get it loose. They recovered about half of it by hand, the rest made its way thru the exhaust system to the garage floor when they fired it up. As the block was already bored .060 over it was right on the edge of endurance without the added stress of the piece of rope cocking the piston and splitting the bore for a few inches from near the top to near bottom.

He pulled the block and had that cylinder sleeved at a machine shop, better than new as the sleeve material was superior to that of the block.

Cost?

Not being one to take bad news lightly, he threw a wrench through a perfectly good garage window and kicked a huge dent in an otherwise perfect 69 SS Camaro door. Also the teardown, sleeve job, and rebuild.
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Old 06-13-2016, 11:58 AM   #74
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Finally I managed to get some work done on the Kfz 17/1. I decided to concentrate on detailing the boot storage area since I should have all the parts and materials to progress this.

For me this is also one of the more fun areas to work on; this is where all the "Zubehör" is stored, so the challenge is to make all the dividers so that all the bits can actually fit.

I started on the left side of the boot, as this defines the spacing for the rest of the dividers in the boot. The left side actually has a deep recess with four compartment, two bottom and two top ones. The top to comportments are closed by two half hight doors.

What is stored in these comportments depends on the type of radio installation used, the "Beladeplan" for each installation details what goes where. Obviously the radio installations for the Kfz 17 and Kfz 17/1 are different, but the luggage compartments were identical, so I had to make sure that various items would fit.

 photo DSC08218_zpsfh7ncuxf.jpg

The compartements are marked a, b, c and d clockwise from the left top in the "Beladeplan" so I will use the same compartment names.

Compartment a (top left) contains one or more hand-cable reels in most versions. This determines the hight and width required for this compartment as the cable reels are a very tight fit.

Comparment b (top right) contains the battery box for the Torn.E.b (for those installations using the Torn.E.b). The box is held in place by wooden formers. This determines the exact place of the dividing wall between compartments a and b, because there is only about 5 mm room to spare.

I am quite happy that I managed to make it all fit:

 photo DSC08219_zpspdeiw8gw.jpg

With the lids closed, it can't move anywhere, important while driving through rough terrain:

 photo DSC08219_zpspdeiw8gw.jpg

In the Kfz 17/1, compartment a held the insulator for the "Stabhochantenne" and the base for the "Steckmast". Again this just fits diagonally. compartment b held the counterpoise wires for the "Stabhochantenne":

 photo DSC08222_zpsgacd8ium.jpg

With the lid closed, the items should remain in place when driving through rough terrain:

 photo DSC08223_zpsppbne5oy.jpg

Compartments c and d held four (old model) tent quarters + accessories in the Kfz 17/1, these were just stacked in the available space. The funny cutout on the wall of compartment d was for the saddle of the "Tretsatz" when the car was fitted with a 5 W.S., again a very snug fit

I can now start with the next compartment, holding the Fu 51 box and the generator or Tretmaschine.

regards,

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Old 06-14-2016, 10:30 PM   #75
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Amazing restoration project.
Highly skilled processing, lovely details.

Luca
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