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Old 05-15-2015, 02:45 PM   #31
Funksammler
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Busy week this week and a major job done. The roof needed covering, important to keep the rain out and prevent the wood from starting to rot.

The roof is made up of planks fitted lengthwise. The roof curves to all sides so the planks are under some strain and the edges were a bit uneven. So the first job was to sand down the roof to ensure all the surfaces are smooth and that all the edges are a nice even curve:

 photo DSC07321_zpspm4ce3eg.jpg

I bought a new sanding machine which worked a treat, even so it took me over a day to get everything sanded down and shaped to my liking. Everying covered in sawdust!

The next phase was to glue a layer of felt to the top of the roof. The felt evens out any remaining ridges and bumps and gives a bit so that the roof covering can be tensioned properly. First I had to clean the roof from all the dust and appied kit to fix the felt in place:

 photo DSC07325_zpshyndtskr.jpg

It is a big area to work on and it was a real challenge to get the felt in place before the kit dried. The edges of he felt are quite difficult to cut evenly, I must have damaged a nerve in my thumb working the scissors, it is still feeling numb days after!

With the felt on I could fit the roof covering material. I am using an artificial leather similar to some scrap samples. I have seen a variety of roofing materials used on various surviving vehicles, from rubberised canvas to artificial leather, I think the material I chose is not too far off.

The trick is to start in the middle and make sure that both sides are stretched nice and tight. Work forward, making sure you keep the material tight and streight while you do so. When you have fastened half a meter or so, stretch and fasten the material to the centre of the front edge of the roof, after which you work towards the corners. Repeat the process on the back half of the roof. This say you get a nice tight result without folds:

 photo DSC07354_zpsm1aa4qj1.jpg

Note that the felt underlayer is cut a bit shorter than the roofing material. The roofing material is nailed the the bottom edge of the roof all around.

Finally a rain gutter is fitted all around the edge of the roof. The rain gutter serves a number of purposes, it clamps the roof material in place and it hides any uneven edges of the roofing material. It also prevents rainwater from entering though the tops of the side panels. I machined the profile of the rain gutter based on the remains on my original panel:

 photo DSC07366_zpsdin5nwwy.jpg

 photo DSC07365_zpsxdsll30z.jpg

 photo DSC07362_zps560wnw8p.jpg

A few minor imperfections to sort out later, but all in all I am quite happy with the result! After that I spend over day cleaning out the garage and everything in it, incredible how much dust was created! In any case: Roof done!

regards,

Funksammler
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Old 05-24-2015, 02:48 PM   #32
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Continuing with the outside details of the car. The parts shown in post #17 had to be cleaned and restored before painting. After drying the sliding panels could be fitted to the side panel of the car:

 photo DSC07424_zpsbhef2cx8.jpg

The top panel on the right side covers a hole for the antenna cable if a fixed antenna (Stabhochantenne) is used with the car. The bottom panel covers a passage for the generator cable.

The antenna storage compartment hatch required significant work. New rain seals and hinge needed to be rivited in place. The hatch was in quite poor condition, so I had to do some filling and sanding before I was happy to paint it. At the same time, the two locking lugs for the hatch had to be assembled. Finally all had to be fitted to the car, closing off another hole in the car's body:

 photo DSC07430_zpsbrgqggsd.jpg

Finally the lifting hooks were fitted. These allow the whole body to be lifted off the chassis in one piece, after removing the ten bolts that keep it connected! Looking through the front windscreen space you can see the strengthening "T"-piece on the other side. The top bolt from the front lifting hook goes through this to ensure that the lifting forces are distributed to the top longitudianal beams of the body.

The overall view of the right hand side of the car is starting to show some nice detail:

 photo DSC07431_zpswgcpbusg.jpg

The next posting will start showing some particular Kfz 17/1 details when I commence on the antenna setup.

regards,

Funksammler
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Old 05-27-2015, 02:34 PM   #33
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As mentioned before the Antenna setup is the main difference between the Kfz 17 and Kfz 17/1. The Kfz 17/1 was set up for VHF radios and uses a rod antenna rather than the big roof frame antenna.

Apart from a quarter wavelength antenna rod, this type of antenna needs a ground plane. In the Kfz 17/1, this ground plane consisted of five wires (+ one connecting wire) built into the ceiling and wall close to the rod antenna mount.

I made this ground plane from six wires soldered into a central hub:

 photo DSC07367_zps1xpiz8ly.jpg

The hub was screwed into the ceiling space with each "leg" of the spider radiating out:

 photo DSC07369_zpsrujaexje.jpg

The remaining "legs" run to the front compartment of the car:

 photo DSC07368_zpsfljyhkp9.jpg

Obviously the ground plane is not symmetrical around the rod antenna, meaning that the Kfz 17/1 had an assymetrical radiation diagram; it will radiate stronger towards the right side of the car than to the left side.

Once the ceiling and side panels are fitted the ground plane will not longer be visible. The connecting wire was connected to a termination block fitted in the top left corner.

regards,

Funksammler
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Old 05-28-2015, 02:00 PM   #34
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Very interesting to follow the progression on you project, and must I say; I am impressed with the quality of your work.
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Old 05-29-2015, 01:22 PM   #35
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With the inside part of the antenna done, it was time to move to the outside. A couple of years ago, I was extremely fortunate to find a complete and original antenna for the Kfz 17/1. The complete antenna consists of the antenna mount, the antenna insulator and the antenna rod. The antenna was placed on the left side of the vehicle:

 photo DSC07425_zpsszelrqor.jpg

The antenna mount is fitted securely with bolts through the woodwork of the body. The mount contains a spring which allows the top part of the mount to pivot in all directions in case the antenna gets snagged. The tension of the spring can be adjusted with the hexagonal nuts on the bottom of the mount:

 photo DSC07426_zpsgjn5o5gx.jpg

Because of the placement of the antenna mount, the top sliding hatch can not be placed as usual on the Kfz 17. It is reversed and shortened to fit. Again I was very lucky to have found an original shortened sliding hatch. A short wire would connect to the antenna connection behind the hatch to the top of the antenna insulator which in turn is electrically connected to the antenna rod.

 photo DSC07429_zpsa9eqdycr.jpg

The Antenna is a rigid 1.4 meter long rod. The thick rod is stirdy enough so that it stays rigid when snagged behind a tree branch or something; instead the whole antenna assembly will pivot on the mount. A metal guard protects the insulator from impact from the front:

 photo DSC07427_zps9y41edtb.jpg

With the antenna fitted, the car is becoming recognisable as a Kfz 17/1 so an important milestone has been achieved!

regards,

Funksammler
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Old 05-31-2015, 02:59 AM   #36
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Amazing work Funksammler. I have an antenna like this but it's painted tan.
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Old 05-31-2015, 07:41 AM   #37
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Hi Yuri,

The rod is actually the standard 1.4 meter rod also used with the Funksprechers. The original 2 meter tank antenna was the same construction (rolled and soldered) until the thinnner drawn steel antennas were introduced.

The antenna rod and insulator ("Isolierzwischenstück") could also be used in the "Stabhochantenna" and placed on a mast next to the vehicle.

The antenna base ("Antennenfuß") is also a standard type used on different radio vehicles such as the Kfz 2. With the Kfz 2 however, a different insulator and rod antenna would be used. See: http://www.wehrmacht-awards.com/foru...d.php?t=532474

I noticed that on some period photographs, the guard (the half conical shaped piece of metal) is not fitted on some early vehicles, so I suspect this was a slightly later feature.

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Old 05-31-2015, 12:24 PM   #38
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The antenna that I have is very thick. 2-3 cm in diameter.
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Old 05-31-2015, 12:46 PM   #39
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I assume it is the one shown here: http://www.wehrmacht-awards.com/foru...hlight=antenna

It looks pretty similar in thickness to the antenna I have with the Kfz 17/1. Does yours have a welded seam?

regards,

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Old 05-31-2015, 02:09 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Funksammler View Post
I assume it is the one shown here: http://www.wehrmacht-awards.com/foru...hlight=antenna

It looks pretty similar in thickness to the antenna I have with the Kfz 17/1. Does yours have a welded seam?

regards,

Funksammler

Yes, it;s the one shown there. I could not find a welded seam. Perhaps it has been polished and finished so well that the seam is not visible.
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Old 06-09-2015, 01:04 PM   #41
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The last few weeks my attention has turned to the interior of the vehicle. A major job was to fit the ceiling panels into the vehicle. Made out of 5 mm thick plywood, the individual panels screw against the ribs of the roof construction. A number of cutouts create a number of roof storage areas. These were used to store the anti reflection panels that could be clipped onto the outside of the window frames.

 photo DSC07452_zpstjg4knjx.jpg

The gaps between the panels individually and the side is covered by narrow wooden strips. Again a lot of screwing is involved fixing these strips. At the same time the side panels were fitted. They will later be fixed permanently once the electrical cabling has been fitted inside the wall space.

 photo DSC07448_zpsrrwnjque.jpg

 photo DSC07451_zps8gmlt0nk.jpg

The front compartment roof has an additional cutout, these will house two lockable document storage bins. Note how the roofline goes from curved in the back to streigth near the windscreen. This makes for rather a compex shape for the ceiling panels!

Also note the connectiong wire to the ground plane in the roof coming down just behind the deviding wall. This will later be fitted to a connection block.

 photo DSC07453_zpsrfwx56kr.jpg

After the ceiling and side panels were fitted, the interior was painted. An undercoat and several layers of top coat were applied. Work seems to slow down while the layers have to dry, the painting was done over several days.

Once the white paint was applied to the top half of the interior, primer and grey paint was applied to the bottom half and the interior of the doors. The only surface left unpainted is the floor which will be done at a later stage.

The work on the interior certainly makes the vehicle look a lot closer to the finished product, a massive amount of detailing yet to do though!

regards,

Funksammler
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Old 06-09-2015, 03:47 PM   #42
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Your work is fantastic!
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Old 06-26-2015, 03:44 AM   #43
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Progress on the Kfz 17/1 has been a bit slower in the past few weeks. The D-day commemorations here in Normandy, travel abroad and other projects meant I could not spend as much time as I would have liked. Also the Kfz 17 needed some TLC after I first had some brake problems followed by an engine problem, all sorted now but again taking up a lot of time.

In any case, I have been continuing with the interior, concentrating on the back of the cabin. The "Parcel shelf" has two levels, the area between which contains a storage area for antenna mast sections ("Steckmast"). The storage area is accessible through the hatch on the right side of the vehicle.

 photo DSC07456_zpsngesrgnb.jpg

The rear of the vehicle also contains another storage shelf over the rear window. In the Kfz 17 this is used to store the "Sternantenne", in the Kfz 17/1 it is used as a general storage area.

The horizontal surfaces of tables and parcel shelf were laquered rather than painted white, I guess this makes for a more durable surface:

 photo DSC07459_zpsex71f0kq.jpg

Note the "step up", hiding the antenna mast storage compartment. A small ridge stops any equipment loosely stored on the parcel shelf from sliding forward. On the left hand side of the parcel shelf was a bracket for a FF 33 field telephone with a fixed line running to the connection point on the left side of the vehicle. This will be restored and fixed at the later date.

 photo DSC07457_zps4smlexet.jpg

I am now slowly working my way forward fitting ever more detail to the inside of the body. I am currently working on the draft strips around the doors (you can see a bit over the left rear door) after which I will fit the electric cabling between the walls. I picked up some more parts during my last travels so I can keep progressing for a while yet. First I want to finish another small restoration project so I suspect progress will remain slow...

regards,

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Old 06-28-2015, 02:53 PM   #44
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Excelente trabajo de restauracion,
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Old 07-13-2015, 07:45 AM   #45
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Still slow but steady progress on the interior. Draft strips were fitted around each of the doors. These are held in place by pertinax strips screwed to the door frames:

 photo DSC07474_zpsxc0pchdb.jpg

 photo DSC07476_zps8tsvlce1.jpg

 photo DSC07475_zpsxv6g5sit.jpg

Also the grab handles were mounted in the rear of the cabin. This allowed the Funkers to hold on when driving through rough terrain. The driver could hold on to his steering wheel while the commander in the front right had a grab handle on the dashboard.

 photo DSC07478_zps54qjnkaf.jpg

Fixing the draft strips added another 40 screws or so per door. I lost count how many screws there are in total! Work is progressing on the interior, I am currently putting cabling in place so I can fix the inner walls, care has to be taken to do the various jobs in the right order, once the walls are fixed it will be difficult to gain access!

regards,

Funksammler
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