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Help: WWI P08 Luger
Old 06-09-2019, 10:38 AM   #1
fpicoli
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Default Help: WWI P08 Luger

Hi,
I found this WWI P08 Luger for sale.
The condition is not very good.
Any information about its value on the market, the maker, the markings, would be helpful.
I would like to ad to my war collection, and not intend use it.
Regards

Fabio


Last edited by fpicoli; 06-09-2019 at 11:20 AM.
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Old 06-09-2019, 01:48 PM   #2
Gary Symonds
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You have a DWM, Deutsche Waffen Munitions 1915 made PO8. DWM was the most prolific maker during WW1.

It was reissued for use in the Reichswehr in 1920, and as such being double dated has an enhanced collector value. This double dating is fairly rare.

The most important question; do all the parts match? The last two digits of the serial number should be on all parts, except for the magazine which rarely matches.

Not sure of the value. You should move this thread to the Firearms Forum for more traction.

Hope this helps.
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Old 06-09-2019, 02:48 PM   #3
jtb1967
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I'd say with a little oil and elbow grease it might clean up some. If the numbers match and the price is right it might be a good one to pick up.
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Old 06-09-2019, 08:24 PM   #4
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Probably not stored very well for a long time, but still in original finish. Oil it down pretty good and let it set a few days, then lightly use 4/0 steel wool to remove some of the rust that has formed.

So many small arms were stolen during WWI that the Reichswehr put out a directive in 1920 that all military small arms be turned in, and were marked in a prescribed manner with the 1920 property stamp. Thereafter if a person was found with a small arm with the 1920 property stamp it was undeniably stolen.
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Old 06-10-2019, 10:07 AM   #5
Alan Smith
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I agree with Johnny . . . with some very careful cleaning, it would probably come out fairly decent. The WWI-era rust blue process used by DWM was very durable and will often clean up a lot better than you might initially suspect.


Is the pistol located in Brazil? If so, is there any history with it that would suggest it being a WWII trophy brought to Brazil by some of your military forces that aided the Allies in WWII? Perhaps from a member of the Brazilian Expeditionary Force, which fought in support of the U.S. Fifth Army in Italy?


Because of the "1920" military inventory stamp, we know that the gun stayed in German military hands post-WWI during the Weimar Republic and, later, National Socialist, eras . . . . . so it would have been used by the German military up until the end of WWII. Here in the U.S. it is common to encounter WWI and Weimar-era P.08 that made it to the U.S. as war trophy bring-backs from WWII, with these earlier production P.08 having remained in continuous service with the German military for some 20-30 years.
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Old 06-10-2019, 10:23 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Smith View Post
I agree with Johnny . . . with some very careful cleaning, it would probably come out fairly decent. The WWI-era rust blue process used by DWM was very durable and will often clean up a lot better than you might initially suspect.


Is the pistol located in Brazil? If so, is there any history with it that would suggest it being a WWII trophy brought to Brazil by some of your military forces that aided the Allies in WWII? Perhaps from a member of the Brazilian Expeditionary Force, which fought in support of the U.S. Fifth Army in Italy?


Because of the "1920" military inventory stamp, we know that the gun stayed in German military hands post-WWI during the Weimar Republic and, later, National Socialist, eras . . . . . so it would have been used by the German military up until the end of WWII. Here in the U.S. it is common to encounter WWI and Weimar-era P.08 that made it to the U.S. as war trophy bring-backs from WWII, with these earlier production P.08 having remained in continuous service with the German military for some 20-30 years.
You are problably right. The gun is in Brazil, but there is no documentation about its previous history. Maybe it was a bring back souvenir from world war II (Italian Campaign). Or maybe not. Any estimated value? I dont know how much would be a bargain
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Old 06-10-2019, 12:53 PM   #7
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Mismatched parts guns in the US are now selling for a minimum of $850.00-$1000.00. You can use that as a guide.
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Old 06-10-2019, 01:00 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mauser888 View Post
Mismatched parts guns in the US are now selling for a minimum of $850.00-$1000.00. You can use that as a guide.
This one has all matching numbered parts
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Old 06-10-2019, 04:48 PM   #9
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I respectfully suggest that U.S. market prices for the item in question are wholly irrelevant to market prices for the same item in Brazil. This is due to a large number of factors, principally including supply/demand considerations, as well as legal restrictions, both of which are going to be unique to each jurisdiction.
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Old 06-10-2019, 08:18 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Smith View Post
I respectfully suggest that U.S. market prices for the item in question are wholly irrelevant to market prices for the same item in Brazil. This is due to a large number of factors, principally including supply/demand considerations, as well as legal restrictions, both of which are going to be unique to each jurisdiction.
I know that, but is always good to hear about the market value and rarity to decide if it is a good investment or not. Here the price is about the double because the law and taxes.

Thank yoj all for the knowledge chared.
Best regards

Fabio
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Old 06-11-2019, 06:28 AM   #11
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USA is most a "type" collector market. Value on some P08 is unreallistic for european market. But the price range is fairly correct for tgis piece that need a gentle cleaning.
something that works fine on this particular pre-pitting hard to remove is to use a cotton cloth with cold gun blue. Before crying, this will not remove the actual blueing nor modify it but most of the pre pitting will go off


Quote:
Originally Posted by fpicoli View Post
I know that, but is always good to hear about the market value and rarity to decide if it is a good investment or not. Here the price is about the double because the law and taxes.

Thank yoj all for the knowledge chared.
Best regards

Fabio
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Old 06-11-2019, 08:56 AM   #12
Douglas Jr.
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Fábio,
I sent you a message through Facebook.
I don't think US prices are a good starting point as there are several differences from the local market (including legal ones).
But I can help you from there, if you wish.
Abraços,
Douglas.
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Old 06-11-2019, 09:41 PM   #13
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When removing rust from a gun, it is the rust itself that is abrasive. It has formed iron oxide with is very abrasive. If the rust is allowed to build up on even the softest cloth, ithe cloth becomes abrasive. Use small pads of 4/0 steel wool, and discard as it picks up the rust.

Never heard of using cold blue for rust removal, but it gives the metal a funky copper sulfate rotten egg smell that lingers for a long time.
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Old 06-17-2019, 10:23 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny Peppers View Post
Probably not stored very well for a long time, but still in original finish. Oil it down pretty good and let it set a few days, then lightly use 4/0 steel wool to remove some of the rust that has formed.

So many small arms were stolen during WWI that the Reichswehr put out a directive in 1920 that all military small arms be turned in, and were marked in a prescribed manner with the 1920 property stamp. Thereafter if a person was found with a small arm with the 1920 property stamp it was undeniably stolen.
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Old 06-17-2019, 05:37 PM   #15
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I'd use bronze wool before steel wool. Bronze wool will remove rust, but won't remove original blue unlike steel wool.
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