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Old 09-11-2017, 08:55 PM   #16
kpaintner
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Old 09-11-2017, 08:57 PM   #17
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Old 09-11-2017, 10:32 PM   #18
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You are right about the Showa stamp. That should mean it's non-traditionally made. I don't know what to think about this thing - it's a WWII blade fitted in seemingly old koshirae. I'm also puzzled by the kanji style - fat and crude.

Hopefully Guy or Bob will comment.
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Old 09-12-2017, 12:28 AM   #19
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This came from a vets family. Could it be something put together during occupational times as a souvenir?
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Old 09-12-2017, 09:38 AM   #20
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During the pre-war rise of nationalism there was a revival of interest in the practice of traditional sword arts. The result was a demand for traditional style katana in usable condition and various firms catered to this demand. Fully traditional blades were expensive and so others were made in a variety of non traditional methods, mounted in the traditional manner. During the war quite a few of these were converted to a greater of lesser degree into Shin Gunto and carried off to war.
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Old 09-12-2017, 04:01 PM   #21
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Can anyone tell who the maker is?
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Old 09-12-2017, 04:17 PM   #22
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Ikami Sadahiro, a Seki smith. Oshigata 270 in "Swordsmiths of Japan 1926-1945", by Fuller & Gregory.

Here's another by him also in civilian koshirae. https://www.gunstar.co.uk/japanese-o.../Blades/928555

And another but in gunto mounts. http://www.militaria.co.za/nmb/topic...on-blacksmith/

Last edited by Beater; 09-12-2017 at 04:27 PM.
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Old 09-12-2017, 08:21 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beater View Post
Ikami Sadahiro, a Seki smith. Oshigata 270 in "Swordsmiths of Japan 1926-1945", by Fuller & Gregory.

Here's another by him also in civilian koshirae. https://www.gunstar.co.uk/japanese-o.../Blades/928555

And another but in gunto mounts. http://www.militaria.co.za/nmb/topic...on-blacksmith/
Good to see you prowling the forum again Kevin! And thanks for the translation! I'm just surprised by the kanji style. But it matches your first one that you referenced!
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Old 09-12-2017, 10:50 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kpaintner View Post
Pic 12

Good looking sword. I like it. IMHO, it's the better one of the three.
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Old 09-13-2017, 12:06 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sengoku View Post
During the pre-war rise of nationalism there was a revival of interest in the practice of traditional sword arts. The result was a demand for traditional style katana in usable condition and various firms catered to this demand. Fully traditional blades were expensive and so others were made in a variety of non traditional methods, mounted in the traditional manner. During the war quite a few of these were converted to a greater of lesser degree into Shin Gunto and carried off to war.
When did the Sho stamp come to being? This will put an earliest date on this sword.
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Old 09-13-2017, 11:15 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldhonda View Post
When did the Sho stamp come to being? This will put an earliest date on this sword.
An article on Ryujin Swords says the showa stamp began in 1940.

And I agree about the blade. I have always enjoyed the officer gunto with bo-hi.
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Old 09-13-2017, 04:04 PM   #27
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Thanks Bruce. That puts the sword as early as 1940.
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Old 09-13-2017, 10:22 PM   #28
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Thanks for all the comments and info
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