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Old 07-17-2017, 01:08 AM   #106
Wilhelm
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I have lost count of how many times Manfred cheated death, way back to his cavalry days. Here is a short British account of his downing reported by Captain H. L. Satchell;

"On occasions, the leader of the enemy aircraft fired a white light which burst into several stars. During the fight, which lasted on and off about an hour, we hit with both forward guns a red enemy plane which was very persistent. It fell out of control, emitting black smoke. Flames were seen on this machine by Pilot Joslyn and observer Potter, Pilot Trevethen and Observer Hoy. The clouds beneath us prevented us from seeing whether it crashed or not."
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Old 08-10-2017, 01:24 PM   #107
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Gibbons wrote, "Richthofen was never the same after that English bullet dented his skull and sent him tumbling down two miles to earth."

Manfred was back with Jasta II. But most of his veteran pilots had been transferred to other Jastas as commanders. Manfred was still a captain, but also a squadron commander with four and sometimes five Jastas under his command. He was back in the air, test flights and Front patrols. He would soon be back up to speed.
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Old 08-16-2017, 01:23 PM   #108
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It was 100 years ago that Richthofen scored his next victory, he was not the same old warrior he had been. His report of this combat is missing from the Reichsarchiv.

Kill # 58 Aug. 16, 1917, place unknown; Nieuport 1; name and fate of occupant unknown.

He was so tired after this action he went to bed for several hours. He had been a sound sleeper, now he was lucky to get "fitful naps".
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Old 08-26-2017, 12:26 PM   #109
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100 years ago Manfred shot down another Englishman. His head wound was not yet healed.

Aug. 26, 1917, between Poelcapelle and Langemarck; Spad 1; second Lieutenant C. P. Williams, killed.
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Old 08-29-2017, 12:13 AM   #110
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100 years ago Manfred wrote a letter to his mother.

Liebe Mamma,

I am glad to hear of Lothar's continuing improvement, but under no circumstances should he be allowed to return to the front before he is entirely fit again.
If he is permitted to do otherwise, he will suffer a relapse or he will be shot down.
I speak from experience.
I have only made two combat flights since my return.
Both were successful, but after both of them I was completely exhausted. During the first one, I nearly became airsick.
My wound is healing very slowly; It is still as large as a five Mark piece. Yesterday they removed another splinter of the bone. I think it will be the last.
Some days ago, the Kaiser visited our section to review the troops. We had a rather long conversation. I am scheduled for leave and am looking forward to seeing you all together.


Manfred
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Old 09-02-2017, 12:30 PM   #111
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It was 100 years ago today that Richthofen flew his triplane for the first time. He liked it.

Kill #60 Sept. 2, 1917, near Zonnebeke; R. E. 2; Second Lieutenant J. B. C. Madge, pilot, wounded and made prisoner, and Second Lieutenant W. Kember, killed.

Manfred wrote; "I approached and fired twenty shots from a distance of fifty yards, whereupon the Englishman fell to the ground and crashed near Zonnebeke."

The observer watched Manfred approach and did not fire. He must have mistaken the Fokker for an English tripe. An expensive mistake.
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Old 09-02-2017, 03:34 PM   #112
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Hi Wilhelm,
Manfred's triplane was probably Fokker D.R.1 prototype F.I 102/17. The same aircraft Kurt Wolff met his demise in later on Sept. 15.
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File Type: jpg Manfred_v_Richthofen_F.l_102_17.jpg (107.2 KB, 143 views)
File Type: jpg Manfred_v_Richthofen_zz.jpg (49.3 KB, 143 views)
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Old 09-03-2017, 03:06 PM   #113
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Great shots Erickn. Shows just how small these machines were. 100 years ago today Manfred scored again.

Kill # 61 Sept 3, 1917, S. of Bousbeeque; Sopwith 1; Lieutenant A. F. Bird, made prisoner.

Richthofen wrote, "The Fokker Triplane, F. I. 102-17, was undoubtedly better and more reliable than the English machine."
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Old 09-03-2017, 07:38 PM   #114
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Hi Wilhelm,
Here is an image of MvR with downed Sopwith Camel.

(Google Images)
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Old 09-03-2017, 07:52 PM   #115
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Many events have happened in the last several weeks including Kurt Wolff shot in both his left shoulder and hand by Ltn. Rowley of No.1 Squadron on 11 July. Kurt crash landed on the Courtrai Railway line ripping the undercarriage of his aircraft off and flipping upside down. Lucky to have survived the crash, he spent several weeks in Field Hospital No.76 in Courtrai with his commander MvR.
Kurt will return soon anxious to fly the new Fokker.

(google images)
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Old 09-03-2017, 10:12 PM   #116
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Hi Wilhelm,

Yes, the aircraft were small but, the best they had......

Fokker Dr.1 Specifications:
Manufacturer: Fokker Flugzeugwerke GmbH
Type: single-seat Fighter
Introduced: 1917
Numbers built: 320
Engine: 110 hp Oberursel UR.II/Le Rhône 9 cylinder rotary
Length: 5.75 m (18 ft 11 1/8 in)
Wingspan: 7.20 m (23 ft 7 3/8 in)
Height: 2.95 m (18 ft 11 1/8 in)
Takeoff weight: 585 kg (1,289.2 lb)
Maximum speed: 165 km/h (103.12 mph) at 4000 m (13,120 ft)
Ceiling: 6100 m (20,013 ft)
Endurance: 1.5 hours
Armament: 2 Spandau 7.92 mm LMG (light machine guns)
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Old 09-04-2017, 10:19 AM   #117
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilhelm View Post
Great shots Erickn. Shows just how small these machines were. 100 years ago today Manfred scored again.

Kill # 61 Sept 3, 1917, S. of Bousbeeque; Sopwith 1; Lieutenant A. F. Bird, made prisoner.

Richthofen wrote, "The Fokker Triplane, F. I. 102-17, was undoubtedly better and more reliable than the English machine."
Hi Wilhelm,
Image in frame #114 is Manfred's 61st victory, B 1795. Self correction, it was a Sopwith Pup.
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Old 09-11-2017, 08:22 PM   #118
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100 years past this day Kurt Wolff, "Zarte bluemein" returned to full duty at Jasta 11 from leave recovering from his wounds of 11 July. Anxious to fly the new Fokker Dr.1 he would share 102/17 w/ MvR in the next few days.

(image from Google images)
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Old 09-15-2017, 08:59 PM   #119
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Hi Wilhelm,
100 years ago today, Kurt Wolff flew without his lucky night cap, the one good luck object he wore on each sortie. His luck ran out as this account from Wikipedia reflects......
The first two Fokker Triplane prototypes had been allocated to Jagdgeschwader 1. On his return, Wolff was eager to fly one of the prototypes in Richthofen's absence. Four days later, on 15 September he found his opportunity. Despite heavily overcast skies, he took off in Fokker Triplane #102/17, accompanied by Leutnant Carl von Schoenebeck flying an Albatros D.V.
Meanwhile, eight Sopwith Camels of No. 10 squadron Royal Naval Air Service, led by Flight Lieutenant Fitzgibbon, were escorting a number of DH-4 bombers back to Allied lines. Somewhere in the vicinity of Moorslede, Belgium, Fitzgibbon spotted a flight of German Albatrosses below them and led half of his men to attack. The remaining Camels stayed with the bombers and were attacked by Wolff and Schoenebeck. The dog fight was intense though brief, and in the confusion the British pilots mistakenly thought that five Albatrosses and four triplanes were involved. As Wolff singled out a Camel, he was suddenly fired on from behind by Flight Sub-Lieutenant Norman MacGregor. MacGregor fired a quick burst, then had to zoom to avoid colliding with the Fokker.
MacGregor reported: "I got into a good position very close on one triplane - within 25 yards - and fired a good burst. I saw my tracers entering his machine. I next saw him going down in a vertical dive, apparently out of control." MacGregor would eventually claim some seven air kills and be awarded the DSC.
In an interview after the war, Schoenebeck gave his own account: "One day we flew both to the front. That was done often because a flight of 2 is harder to spot than a whole squadron. If one was smart enough to use the sun in one's back, the enemy could be easily surprised. Wolff was a smart leader and from the sun we attacked an enemy flight. Wolff was shooting brilliantly but got caught in a dogfight. I flew behind him, as suddenly another Englishman appeared behind me. I only was able to get rid of him with great difficulty. While I was busy shaking off the Englishman, another machine attacked Wolff from behind and before I could help I saw how Wolff was going down into a spin and hit the ground. So was Lt. Wolff, who had me for covering him and who had to protect myself, falling in front of my very eyes. I was deeply shocked. At his funeral I had to carry his cushion of decorations."
It seems probable that Wolff was killed by MacGregor's bullets and was already dead when his Fokker Dr.I crashed and burst into flames north of Wervik at 17.30 hours (German time). Wolff's remains were taken back to Memel for burial.
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File Type: jpg Kurt_WOLFF%20CURT.jpg (207.6 KB, 123 views)
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Old 09-15-2017, 09:02 PM   #120
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Wolff's Funeral, MvR was not able to attend.
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