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Luftwaffe Observers...
Old 12-04-2019, 07:07 PM   #1
Bob Lyons
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Default Luftwaffe Observers...

This might be of some interest perhaps....


From “The Rise And Fall of the German Air Force (1933 to 1945)”, Page 32. U.K. Air Ministry Publication No. 248. (1948).


(23.) – One of the most interesting aspects of the pre-war Air Force training was that of observers. In a German bomber the observer was to be the captain
of the aircraft; thus he had to be the most experienced crew member, and capable of taking over the duties of other members of the crew in an emergency.
His training therefore, was both comprehensive and varied. He was trained as a pilot up to the “C” standard, i.e., had done some 150 hours’ flying as a pilot.
He then went to an Observer School, where he began an intensive course in navigation instruction, observers were also expected to train in radio, gunnery and
bomb-aiming, as well as to pass through a blind flying school. Soon after outbreak of war the rule of the observer being the captain of the aircraft was dropped,
and observer training deteriorated progressively from 1942 onwards. Finally, observers were only receiving 4 – 6 months training.

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Old 12-04-2019, 07:52 PM   #2
Gary B
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Interesting. Similar to a WWI aircraft where the Observer was an officer and the Pilot was an NCO. Thanks for posting, Bob!

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Old 12-04-2019, 08:44 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary B View Post
Interesting. Similar to a WWI aircraft where the Observer was an officer and the Pilot was an NCO. Thanks for posting, Bob!

Gary B

Thanks Gary

And also from the same book….

From “The Rise And Fall of the German Air Force (1933 to 1945)”, Pages 31 -32. U.K. Air Ministry Publication No. 248. (1948).

Initial Pilot Training.

(18.) – Recruits, including officer candidates, were sent on joining the Air Force to a Flieger Ausbildungs Regiment or Recruit Depot.
This corresponded roughly to the Royal Air Force I.T.W. (Initial Training Wing) stage. A recruit would spend about 6 to 12 months
learning little else but military discipline and physical culture; the air aspect was only introduced in lectures on the elementary
principles of wireless and in map reading. All entrants, both for flying and ground duties, passed through this course which later,
and under pressure f war, had to be reduced in duration to 2 to 3 months.

Flight Training.

(19.) – On the passing-out from the Recruit Depot, two months were spent by the recruit at a pool known as the Fluganwaerterkompanie.
Here the recruit awaited his flying training posting and spent up to two months studying general aeronautical subjects. Flying training began
at an Elementary Flying Training School (the Luftwaffe called it an A/B School) where the pupil was given from 100 to 150 hours’ flying, of
which about 5 hours were dual and about 25 hours comprised circuits and bumps, take offs, simple bankin g turns and attempts at three-
point landings in light Focke-Wulf, Klemm or Beucker biplanes. In the second stage of the Elementary Flying Training Course, the candidate
pilot was being closely watched, for he was now about to be awarded his pilot’s certificate and wings (Badge). His instructors were deciding
if he would be more suitable as a bomber or fighter pilot, or perhaps as an observer or reconnaissance pilot. Thereafter flying training depended
on the nature of th e specialisation.

(20.) – Prospective bomber and reconnaissance pilots were drafter to “C” Schools, where they trained on twin-engined aircraft. The course
lasted from 3 to 6 months and included about 60 hours’ flying; night flying, as well as a certain amount of blind and cross-country flying were also
features of this stage of training. The training aircraft included obsolescent operational types and current service aircraft. On leaving the “C” School,
bomber and reconnaissance pilots would be sent to a six weeks’ course at a specialised Blind Flying School, where a further 50 to 60 hours’
flying would be done, including work with the Link ground trainer. The next stage was at the bomber or reconnaissance specialist school. This course,
lasting about three months, was devoted to combined crew training of pilot, wireless operator and observer in operational aircraft of the latest
design. The general training at these specialised bomber and reconnaissance schools was on similar lines that of the “C” Schools, though the
night and cross-country flights were of longer duration and undertaken in all types of weather. After completion of the course, bomber and
reconnaissance crews were usually posted to an operational unit, having passed through a total training of between 18 months to 2 years with
approximately 250 hours of flying.

(21.) – The prospective fighter pilot, on being awarded his pilot’s certificate and badge, passed on to a Fighter School and took a three months’
course in elementary fighter types which eventually led to traing on the operational Me 109 or twin engined Me 110. He might be given some
50 hours’ flying, in either of the latter, so that before being posted to an operational squadron he would have done a total of some 200 hours’ flying.



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