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Radio equipment from Sardinia
Old 03-21-2009, 02:21 PM   #1
Norm F
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Default Radio equipment from Sardinia

Hi All,
This is an original 1943 photo showing some German marinenachrichten equipment set up at an ad hoc base in Sardinia during the summertime.
Can anyone identify the type of equipment?
Regards,
---Norm
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Old 03-21-2009, 02:22 PM   #2
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Lorenz Lo6K39a?
Old 03-21-2009, 02:48 PM   #3
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Default Lorenz Lo6K39a?

Searching on the net reveals an almost exact match for the large machine on the R, i.e. a Lorenz Short Wave Receiver Lo6L39.
http://www.agder.net/la8ak/12c.htm
However, I gather there were several models that looked almost identical -- Lo6L39 and Lo6K39, presumably slight variations on a theme? I think the L had slightly lighter colour conforming to the photo better than the K. Close scrutiny of the pyramidal shaped readout in the lower centre shows a slight difference between my old photo and the one pictured on that site:

Perhaps that depends on how it's set? (Revealing my technical ignorance...)
What about the other equipment in the photo?
Cheers.
---Norm

Last edited by Norm F; 03-21-2009 at 03:09 PM.
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Old 03-21-2009, 09:40 PM   #4
Yuri D.
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Here is my set:

http://www.battlefrequencies.com/radios/lo6k39a.php

http://www.battlefrequencies.com/radios/lo40K39d.php

The lo6K39a is the shortwave version of the receiver (the "k" stands for "Kurzwellen")

The lo6L39 is the longwave version (the "L" stands for "Langwellen")

But what's interesting is the Junker Morse key and the shock mount of the receiver

Yuri
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Old 03-22-2009, 09:55 AM   #5
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[The lo6L39 is the longwave version (the "L" stands for "Langwellen")

But what's interesting is the Junker Morse key and the shock mount of the receiver

Yuri[/QUOTE]


Junker key was standard Kriegsmarine issue. Anybody desparate to have one ?


rgds ragnar

Last edited by la5he@yahoo.no; 03-31-2009 at 05:32 AM.
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Lorentz
Old 03-22-2009, 09:59 AM   #6
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Default Lorentz

The photo must show a Lo6K39 ( Shortwave version ) as the transmitter next to it is a Lo40K39 . I used one of them as a new ham in the 1950s and even worked Antartica on 40 m from down-town Oslo !!
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Very interesting!
Old 03-22-2009, 11:18 AM   #7
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Default Very interesting!

Very interesting! On my old photo it looks like the the Lo6k39a is set in the 4 MHz range. Now it all makes sense. And the shock absorbing bracket it sits upon just as pictured in Yuri's webpage!
And thanks Ragnar and Yuri for identifying the transmitter to the left. I see from Yuri's website that the transmitter device is on the top, and the plainer box below is the power supply.
I wonder when they would use shortwave vs. longwave?
Is the Junker key that small device to the right of the receiver, and was it for sending Morse code?
(My father was the Marinenachrichtenoffizier responsible for setting up all the German radio stations in Sardinia and Corsica in 1942-43, and of course is not around anymore to answer these questions.)
Best regards,
---Norm
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Old 03-31-2009, 04:34 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuri D. View Post
I find an interesting lines in the description of your receiver, Yuri: "
The purpose for this receiver's design is very unique. It is a direct amplification receiver for a reason. On super-heterodyne receivers, the oscillator generates a weak signal at the required intermediate frequency. There is a danger, however small, that this signal escapes the receiver through the antenna, and will be triangulated by enemy direction finders. Whether or not this is in fact true, the Germans took no chances, and used a TRF receiver on their battleships".


And possibly, this type of receiver is more adecuate at the radioelectric environment of the battleship.


Do you compare with modern receivers?






Jan.

Last edited by Yuri D.; 04-25-2013 at 01:43 AM.
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Lorentz radios
Old 03-31-2009, 04:49 AM   #9
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Default Lorentz radios

[QUOTE=Norm F;3156071]Very interesting! On my old photo it looks like the the Lo6k39a is set in the 4 MHz range. Now it all makes sense. And the shock absorbing bracket it sits upon just as pictured in Yuri's webpage!
And thanks Ragnar and Yuri for identifying the transmitter to the left. I see from Yuri's website that the transmitter device is on the top, and the plainer box below is the power supply.


YES- that is correct.



I wonder when they would use shortwave vs. longwave?

THis set-up obviously was for short-wave. LW-mostly used in naval communications or up North where Aurora Borealis would render shortwaves useless in the winter-season. ( Black-outs)




Is the Junker key that small device to the right of the receiver, and was it for sending Morse code?

That is what morsekeys are for !!! hi

This equipment is very rugged !!!

rgds ragnar
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Old 03-31-2009, 05:35 AM   #10
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[IMG]
[/IMG]

Here is one of my Junkers. IF you are desparate to have one, drop me a line

Rgds Ragnar
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key lorenc
Old 04-27-2012, 05:37 AM   #11
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Default key lorenc



Uploaded with ImageShack.us

Uploaded with ImageShack.us
Hello, here are my keys lorenc 73 of E77QQ
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abt Morse Key .....
Old 05-05-2012, 10:12 AM   #12
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Default abt Morse Key .....

Some time ago I found an interesting fact - it turns out that the Americans have used the German technical experience. Someone gave me a Morse key, an american one,

https://picasaweb.google.com/1097768...36682758270994

but after I removed its aluminum plate, the German original appeared below ...

https://picasaweb.google.com/1097768...36975560180610


Nick
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Old 05-05-2012, 01:48 PM   #13
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hello
i had works for sait electrinics as radio ,we still use this morse key in the years 1972 -80 SAIT has a lot of MORSE KEY that they used after WWII and i believe sait is not american firm
pierre
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Old 07-08-2019, 06:57 PM   #14
Norm F
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On this topic of equipment used in Sardinia in 1943, here are some photos of the Funkmessgerät that my father was tasked with secretly transporting to the top of the mountain at Asinara. After Herculean efforts, just as they got it to the top, they were told they didn't need it anymore and to bring the whole damn thing back to Rome...

This was a radar unit and was intended I think for use when the Germans were fooled into thinking that the main Allied invasion would come through Sardinia. When they discovered that wasn't the case they took it back down.

Best regards,
---Norm
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File Type: jpg 20cSardiniaAsinara.jpg (238.8 KB, 126 views)
File Type: jpg 20bSardiniaAsinara.jpg (230.9 KB, 122 views)
File Type: jpg 20eSardiniaAsinara.jpg (233.4 KB, 122 views)

Last edited by Norm F; 07-08-2019 at 07:21 PM.
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Old 07-09-2019, 11:01 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuri D. View Post
But what's interesting is the Junker Morse key and the shock mount of the receiver

Yuri
On this site, there is a photo from the original manual that shows the Lorenz Lo6K39a receiver sitting on the shock mount. Nice to correlate with the 1943 photo.

Best regards,
---Norm
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