wehrmacht awards

Red Lightweight MkII Helmet.
Old 11-04-2019, 02:16 PM   #1
dragnet
Member
 
dragnet is offline
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: wales
Posts: 4,804
Default Red Lightweight MkII Helmet.

First for me being a lightweight produced helmet, dont have a magnet but im leaning towards aluminium No date to the liner but made by Vero. The shell i belived started life with a grey colour, then black and lastly the red with silver letters ''WA'' to the front. Anyone with further insight would be gratefully
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 068.jpg (54.7 KB, 100 views)
File Type: jpg 066.jpg (63.5 KB, 100 views)
File Type: jpg 069.jpg (78.3 KB, 99 views)
File Type: jpg 071.jpg (110.6 KB, 100 views)
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-04-2019, 03:30 PM   #2
tinlid
Member
 
tinlid's Avatar
 
tinlid is offline
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: hampshire
Posts: 362
Default

Private purchase, and came in grey. I think they were spun on a lathe and shaped with a stick. Hence the ring pattern on the helmet,which you might not be able to see now it's been over painted.
Letters could be for anything from a specific job, or company initials.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-07-2019, 04:58 AM   #3
2 Black Bands
New Member
 
2 Black Bands is offline
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: UK
Posts: 33
Default

I agree....these things are actually quite common but remain a mystery. They certainly look like they've been "turned" and the concentric rings are most visible on the inside...although as Mr Lid says, any over-paint may have covered that. Red indicates "FIRE" more often than not and "WA" could be virtually anything (as long as it starts with a "W" !) - my money would also be on a Factory initials, pre any possible NFS affiliation. It's really irritating that most of the numerous "Commercial Variants" remain unidentified re who made them etc - some are plastered all over period advertising (like the PLASFORT, Cromwell etc) whilst others don't appear at all...including things like this. Based on the numbers, the material used and the technology required (assuming they ARE lathe-cut) one would have thought that the producers were quite big in their field. I've often thought about the production, assuming they are spun......they'd produce a whole load of waste/off-cuts/shavings (whatever) at a time when metal was at a premium...presumably the bits were collected and re-processed??? 'any Metal workers in the house to comment????
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-07-2019, 07:16 AM   #4
tinlid
Member
 
tinlid's Avatar
 
tinlid is offline
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: hampshire
Posts: 362
Default

There was a video on YouTube, can't find it now, typical.
It showed a piece of metal being spun, using just a stick, length of wood, he shaped the helmet. No wastage as far as I remember.
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-07-2019, 03:52 PM   #5
lnijherald
Member
 
lnijherald's Avatar
 
lnijherald is offline
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Delft, Netherlands
Posts: 2,975
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tinlid View Post
I think they were spun on a lathe and shaped with a stick. Hence the ring pattern on the helmet,which you might not be able to see now it's been over painted.

I always thought these were deep drawn but using a lathe makes more sense.


Luc
  Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump






vBulletin skins developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Copyright Wehrmacht-Awards.com