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BIOS Report on the Leica production 1946. Detail on who bought the Leica in 1946
Old 01-03-2020, 11:44 AM   #1
Mikedenmark
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Default BIOS Report on the Leica production 1946. Detail on who bought the Leica in 1946

I found this report on the internet.
Made by the british in 1946.
Unfortunately, not much about the binoculars, ecpect that they did make binoculars. The brits were there to steal the Leica. The result was the Reid camera: https://www.canonrangefinder.org/Reid_Cameras.htm

But, it did have the details below on who could buy Leica cameras in October 1946.
Probably, binoculars was distributed in a similar manner.

Production and Costs Etc.
54. In November 1946, the production of Leica Cameras was
1100 per month of which 89% was allocated to the American
forces, 6% for French forces and 5% for German sales. A
small proportion of the American 89% was available for the
British forces in exchange for Rolliflex cameras.
55. Although the the camera was in great demand production was
limited owing to shortage of materials, particularly optical
glass. Stocks of brass and other metals appeared to be high.
56. Through the shortage of optical glass, lens manufacture
was confined to the f/3.5 5 cm. (standard) and 3.5 cm. (wide
angle) and the f/4.9 cm. and f/4.5 13.5 cm. lenses.
57. The price of the camera with Elmar f/3.5 5 cm. bloomed
lenses and ever-ready case is now 40% above pre-war price with
an addition of Rm. 30 for these models fitted with ball bearings.
58. This makes the German retail price of the camera as
described Rm. 546.6
59. The body without lens or case would be Rm. 394
Other Products.
60. The main items of production at the time of inspection,
besides the Leica camera, were binoculars, projection apparatus
and microscopes. The microscopes included the H. Powder
Binocular, Students, Panphot and Ortholux.


Link to the whole report:
http://www.angelfire.com/biz/Leica/page27.html
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Old 01-10-2020, 08:47 AM   #2
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Thank you so much for showing us
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Old 01-10-2020, 10:16 AM   #3
Sgt Bilko
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The brits were there to steal the Leica.

The Soviets got it too so why not the Brits?
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Old 01-11-2020, 02:21 AM   #4
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A lot of countries had trouble with a trade deficit towards Germany, mainly in industrial goods, and for long periods.
The attempts after WWII, successfull, or not, to transfer german technology abroad, is an indication, that the issue was still very live in 1945.
I have seen it described as one of the reasons for WWI as well.

But blueprints alone cannot make it happen. The russians took employees and machinery as well. And that is probably why, for years, they managed to make camera´s like the FED or the Zorki.
Some germans were there up to 10 years, unvoluntarily, enough time to teach their trade to locals.

One funny detail is how foreign goods sold in Britain should be maked: Made in "country of origin" Like: Made in Germany. (or marked: Foreign)
This way, british customers should be enabled to only buy british. Unfortunately, the "Made in Germany" mark became known as a symbol of quality instead. Not exactly what was intended.

In Denmark, we marked things: DA, for Dansk Arbejde. (Danish made) It was the trend in Europa for countries to be selfsufficient as much as possible. To save foreign currency and preserve jobs. Most countries were too small, or specialised, to make it a success. Germany could not make enough food, and in Denmark, we made more food than goods. Danish Bacon anyone?
That is where the german concept of "Neuropa" fitted in. A selfsufficient Europa. Still with national currencies, and exchange accounts to even out the trade differences. The blueprint for the later EU. Nothing new there.

And yes, why not the british as well? The Ami´s stole the secret of carbon paper from the germans. With considerable success.
( For younger readers: Before the photo copy machine, copying was done with something called a typewriter, and layers of carbon paper was used to create duplicates.)
Carbon paper was a german export success, at least before WWII. After the war, US companies could make it themself. They stole the process from IG Farben. ( Or requested, sounds nicer )

Next time, the french will try to copy Audi´s and BMW´s. Unlikely to work, ever.
(And the trade deficit against Germany is still with us)

Back to bino´s, I guess. Sorry for digressing.

Last edited by Mikedenmark; 01-11-2020 at 02:34 AM.
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Old 01-11-2020, 05:36 AM   #5
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Sadly, in recent years the "Made in Germany" mark became meaningless as any old tat could be reboxed in Germany and sold as such. The benefits of globalisation I suppose...
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Old 01-11-2020, 06:41 PM   #6
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Like this one:
https://www.yoycart.com/Product/15377028139/
The world famous Mauser binocular.

Some years ago, old german arms manufacture names were used on a variety of modern good, often fairly unrelated to the original trades of the company. I remember seing both Walther and Mauser items.

( not that the original story of the companies doesn´t have weird things, Like the Mauser car, and the Walther calculator. Yes, both real.)

Lately, The Royal Copenhagen Porcelaine factory has outsourced production to Thailand. Now it is only marked Royal Copenhagen. The "Denmark" has been omitted.
We suppose that wages are lower in Thailand. Taxes on fuel for the furnaces for burning the porcelaine are definitely much lower.
So, very environment friendly items. Made where no one cares... Yet!

And yes, I agree: The benefits of globalisation.
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