wehrmacht awards


Go Back   Wehrmacht-Awards.com Militaria Forums > Ken Jasper International Militaria Forums > Korean War

Korean War Dedicated to the history and memorabilia of the war in Korea, 1950 to the present.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes

Old 01-29-2010, 11:15 AM   #16
rexmundi
Member
 
rexmundi is offline
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Holland
Posts: 1,075
Default

No it is in my personal collection complete with documents, cases etc. The US Bronze Star and CIB are special. But what about the US Soldiers Medal and the Korean bravery award in the last place!

A fact a lot american's don't know is that bronze and silver stars have been awarded to foreign soldiers.... Even some (non official) Purple Hearts,
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-29-2010, 12:04 PM   #17
Bill D.
Moderator
 
Bill D.'s Avatar
 
Bill D. is offline
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 6,035
Default

I didn't recognize the Soldier's Medal on the medal bar or ribbon bar.
The ribbon that was used is either not the correct ribbon or has perhaps faded a bit. The fact that the ribbon is off is not anything unusual. I have seen the same thing when the individual who was mounting the decorations did not have the exact, correct ribbon.
  Reply With Quote

Old 01-29-2010, 12:07 PM   #18
Bill D.
Moderator
 
Bill D.'s Avatar
 
Bill D. is offline
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 6,035
Default

You're also correct that many Americans don't know that our decorations have been conferred upon non-Americans.

The Congressional Medal of Honor was conferred upon the unknown soldiers of France and Great Britain after World War I.

All other decorations, from the Distinguished Service Cross and Navy Cross down, have been awarded to foreign soldiers. Not long ago I saw a photo of a Soviet fighter pilot from WW II. On his flying uniform, along with his Red Banner and Order of Lenin, he was wearing the U.S. Distinguished Service Cross.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-16-2011, 01:40 PM   #19
buccaneere
Member
 
buccaneere is offline
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: NC/US
Posts: 71
Default

Dad and Gramps in Japan, while dad was doing a tour in Korea. I don't know where, or with what units...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 52_Jap.jpg (52.0 KB, 266 views)
File Type: jpg scan0005.jpg (105.3 KB, 265 views)
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-16-2011, 02:27 PM   #20
MattS
Member
 
MattS's Avatar
 
MattS is offline
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Indiana
Posts: 1,237
Default

Great photo! Obviously an airborne infantry lieutenant who proudly wears his jump wings on his cap, but I can't make out the patch.
  Reply With Quote

Old 02-17-2011, 09:10 AM   #21
Bill D.
Moderator
 
Bill D.'s Avatar
 
Bill D. is offline
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 6,035
Default

To me that patch looks like the 187th Regimental Combat Team.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 187rct.jpg (64.6 KB, 257 views)
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-03-2011, 11:43 PM   #22
david_iu
Member
 
david_iu is offline
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 759
Default

Thanks Bill for starting this topic. I have been interested in Korean War. I have no relatives serving for the communist side in the Korean War. Yet I know some Chinese veterans who participated. I think I should pour in some ideas on behalf of "the other side" as a Chinese living in Hong Kong, which is now part of China. I have always been hearing stories from my Father as to how Allied troops were transited through Hong Kong, which was a British colony during Korean War, to Korea. Yes, Hong Kong was in a sensitive position during Korean War, being a Chinese territory and British colony at the same time.
  Reply With Quote

A pow...
Old 06-26-2011, 08:51 PM   #23
Granate
Member
 
Granate's Avatar
 
Granate is offline
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Ohio
Posts: 245
Default A pow...

My father was there in 1950, so was my wife's dad. And my uncle too. My Uncle became famous for his picture taken and placed on the cover of either "Life" or "Time Magazines"? He was the guy who was looking up into the air as P-80's flew by. He had just been captured by the Chinese after a large battle with them. They overran him and his company (I believe that was the amount of US soldiers there). He and quite a few of the other mates surrendered during the battle. He was looking at them because he wanted them to strafe the areas around him so that they could run for their lives. Evidently the Pilots were not thinking the same things.

When he was granted Home because of the nice "Peoples of Communist North Korean, something, something as to that fact. He was a MESS when he came home. His injuries to his face, back and knees were bad. They had broken or tried to, his bones in these spots. They also burned him constantly with cigarettes in his armpits, Groin area, basically where ever they could hide it from prying eyes. He WAS never the same again until his death in 2006, If I remember correctly.

Does anybody here think they may have that magazine article with him on the cover of it? If so then can you post it here so I can see him again one last time? It would mean a lot to me here? In the meanwhile I will try and find the magazine issue again to see if I still have it. It has been lost since a few years back, none-the-less I am going to look for it again. Thanks Guys for any help with this endeavor.

Mark
MACVSOG "Living Historian"
  Reply With Quote

Old 06-28-2011, 09:32 AM   #24
Granate
Member
 
Granate's Avatar
 
Granate is offline
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Ohio
Posts: 245
Default

Following up on the article above, it was Newsweek in which I found his smaller picture version of him. Newsweek March 8, 1999 Bottom of page 20. And this kills me to death because Douglas Duncan DID NOT take the picture of my uncle. He has lied, and lied, and furthermore lied, about taking his picture. My Uncle picture was not taken by this A$$Hole, period. It was a Chinese photographer that took the picture y Uncle once told me. He remembered because there were NO other Americans around in Chinese hands, except for the other soldiers who were captured. If there were ANY American Photographers around they would of been shot by the Chinese.

That is my update so far that is until I find that full picture?

Mark
MACVSOG "Living Historian"
  Reply With Quote

Not a "forgotten war" to me
Old 07-31-2011, 07:42 PM   #25
Robert Y.
New Member
 
Robert Y. is offline
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: S. Texas
Posts: 16
Default Not a "forgotten war" to me

The Korean War has always loomed large in my consciousness, probably because I started school in 1952 and was becoming aware of the wider world.
I listened to the daily reports of the progress (or lack of) of the Panmunjom talks on the radio. Not sure I understood fully, but I sensed they were something of importance.
It made a big impression on me that one of my friends lived alone with his mom...very unusual in those times when divorces were rare. His dad had been killed in Korea.
Though just about every male in my world over the age of 30 was a WWII veteran, Korea was just as real to me. I loved F-86's and F9F Panther jets, and built the models soon as I had the skill. With all the Korean War movies (Bridges at Toko-RI, Pork Chop Hill, a BUNCH of B-movies) not to mention the M.A.S.H. TV series still in reruns, it's beyond comprehension to me that the public in general apparently has little or no knowledge of this conflict, particulary since it continues to this day ! Unbelievable...no wonder we get into messes overseas all the time.
As a last comment and a side note: I went for a checkup last week to my family doctor of more than 40 years. Getting into his late 80's and still practicing. Not knowing his exact age, I asked if he'd served in the military during Korea. Turns out he's two or three years older than I realized...said no, he'd served in WWII and received his discharge papers from the Reserves just ten days before they tried to call him back for Korea. So now I'm hoping I get a chance to find out about his WWII service.
  Reply With Quote

Korean War
Old 07-31-2011, 11:56 PM   #26
army_inc
Association Member
 
army_inc's Avatar
 
army_inc is offline
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Virginia, USA
Posts: 419
Default Korean War

I've been wanting to read books about the Korean war. My grandfather served as a F51 and F86 pilot during that time. He shot down one mig and got the silver star and korean Chung Moo award with a gold star for what he did in Korea. I don't know much about it. I'd love to find out. When He was inducted in the Michigan Aviation Hall of Fame in 1997 I heard a song that was written in that time period about his air craft (air force 801 or AF801). To me it's a pretty interesting time period. I just can't find out any information about what my grandfather did except for what he told me before he died. Its definately something that shouldn't be forgotten. Men died in this war just like any other war. We can honor them and possibly help other people learn about the Korean War.
__________________
Proud Member in the Stonewall Brigade!. 29th LET'S GO!
My Collection:
http://www.wehrmacht-awards.com/foru...d.php?t=450831
  Reply With Quote

Korean War
Old 08-01-2011, 01:07 PM   #27
Robert Y.
New Member
 
Robert Y. is offline
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: S. Texas
Posts: 16
Default Korean War

Dave, I don't know how much background knowledge you have about the Korean War. To get started I'd say learn the basic chronology from internet sites like Wikipedia, or even a textbook. You need to see maps showing the troop movements 1950-53 and it will then make sense.
As I understand it, Korea was divided when the occupying Japanese left in 1945...each side intending to someday conquer the other and unite Korea. The North invaded in 1950, pushing S. Korean and the few U.S. troops down to the end of the peninsula in a tiny area around Pusan. The U.S./U.N. landed troops on the coast at Inchon fairly close to Seoul.
Northern invaders were pushed out of S. Korea and U.S./U.N./S. Koreans pushed on through N. Korea to near the border with China in the north.
The Chinese then sent troops in to save N. Korea. U.S./U.N./S. Koreans were then pushed back down the peninsula to the area of the original border (38th parallel) and fighting continued while armistice talks took place until the truce in 1953. Which resulted in the current situation...technically still at war and now and then incidents and skirmishes along the armistice line.
Maybe the organization that honored your grandfather can help you get his military records, find out what unit he was with so you can get their history etc.
I lost my last two uncles during the past months. One had been a B-25 then A-26 Invader medium bomber pilot in WWII, and we'd talked about his experiences. The other flew B-24 heavy bombers, never talked about it. Before he died I was trying to get info from my cousin, but she said he never really said much even to his daughters. So now that history is largely lost.
  Reply With Quote

Forgotten War
Old 11-16-2012, 12:47 PM   #28
historyguy
Member
 
historyguy's Avatar
 
historyguy is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Minnesota, USA
Posts: 2,466
Default Forgotten War

I finally got around to copying this article; unfortunately it does not give the year... Interesting that even during the fighting, to many the war was already ''forgotten.''

Not that this is any justification, but this past summer I read the five-volume U.S. Marine Operations in Korea. Volumes I-III (Pusan, Inchon/Seoul, Chosin) were fascinating. Volume IV covered SE Korea in 1951 and was OK. Volume V covered 1952-1953 & the stalemate in West Korea-- it was actually boring. Once the big battles for huge regions of land ended and it became obvious Korea would be a limited war of position, I think the general public just lost interest.

Again, it's no justification for making Korea the Forgotten War, but I think it may explain why it happened.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg forgotten.JPG (139.6 KB, 91 views)
  Reply With Quote

Old 11-16-2012, 12:48 PM   #29
historyguy
Member
 
historyguy's Avatar
 
historyguy is offline
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Minnesota, USA
Posts: 2,466
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by buccaneere View Post
Dad and Gramps in Japan, while dad was doing a tour in Korea. I don't know where, or with what units...
That is a fantastic photo of your father!

Thanks for sharing it with us.
  Reply With Quote

Old 03-13-2017, 02:59 PM   #30
boyt44
Member
 
boyt44 is offline
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: michigan
Posts: 182
Default

I maintain a Flickr photo page of (mainly) Korean War era color slides that I've collected. Whenever possible, I try to find the name of the original photographer, which sometimes takes more than a little digging and detective work (sadly, most of these slides come to me via estate sales-family members had no interest in them)
There's a huge amount of interest in these images in Korea-cameras were rare, and color film was really only available to US Servicemen. Kodak Kodachrome film had to be sent back to the US for processing then. These scanned slides are all over the Korean 'net now, and to a lesser degree, Japan.
The page is here, for those interested:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/58451159@N00/albums
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump






vBulletin skins developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright Wehrmacht-Awards.com