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Japanese dog tags
Old 08-12-2017, 09:38 PM   #1
twoodson412
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Default Japanese dog tags

Are these original? I'm assuming they are because of the grouping it came with.
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Old 08-12-2017, 11:47 PM   #2
Rod G
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Left side tag:

(The kanji code is: 誉 Homare) 11935 = 136th Infantry Regiment with the 43rd Division ended the war on Saipan with the Northern Marianas Army Group, 31st Army.

I haven't got anything on the tag on the right side.

Best of luck!

Rod
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Old 08-13-2017, 12:47 AM   #3
GeorgeP
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I echo what Rod has written about the left tag.

The right tag is an unidentified unit (number wise). However, it does have the divisional code of "Rai" top right corner, which was the code for the 29th Division
last located on Guam (although both Saipan and Guam are in the Mariana island chain, so units could have been moved around and found on the same island when the tags were captured.).

Patina on the left tag looks great. Right is steel and these don't pop up too much. Looks over-cleaned.

Tom
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Old 08-13-2017, 08:44 AM   #4
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As Tom says the right side tag is almost certainly from the 29th Division, 3281 falls within the 3200-99 code numbers distributed to it, although (as already noted) there is no record of this number or its associated unit. Outside the division there are only two 32XX recorded and those are for a couple of independent rapid firing gun battalions however the code kanji seems to confirm its origin.

The 29th Division shipped directly to Saipan from Manchuria in Feb. 1944 and later to Guam. Whatever the case there was opportunity enough for this tag to have remained on Saipan.

Rod
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Old 08-13-2017, 01:24 PM   #5
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Thank you. I got them in a grouping with some other stuff. Does anyone know what the oval and square shaped items with the hole in the middle are?
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Old 08-13-2017, 02:46 PM   #6
GHP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twoodson412 View Post
Thank you. I got them in a grouping with some other stuff. Does anyone know what the oval and square shaped items with the hole in the middle are?
Coins.



Back Side:
當百 [with kao/signature of Gotō San'emon]
This [is] 100 [mon; a denomination]

Front side:
天保通寳
Tenpō, Tsuho
Tenpō era: December 1830 through December 1844.

Here's a good English Wiki Tenpō Tsuho
Quote:
Japan 100 Mon Tempo Tshuho (Oval Coin, Square Hole) 1835 to 1870

What you've probably got, Lou, is a bronze 100 mon coin from Japan. There are a few other patterns of Asian logograms, but the one shown in our picture is the most common. It is hard to miss the unusual shape.

Coins with the pattern shown catalog like this:

worn: $5 US dollars approximate catalog value
average circulated: $15
well preserved: $25

source

Last edited by GHP; 08-13-2017 at 03:12 PM.
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Old 08-13-2017, 02:52 PM   #7
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Large circular coin:

寛永通寳
Kan'ei Tsuho

Quote:
In 1626 the Tokugawa Shogunate of Japan introduced a new cast copper coin known as the Kanei Tsuho. It replaced a mixture of Chinese coins and privately minted coins that were in circulation. The 1 Mon Kanei Tsuho coin was the lowest denomination issued, and served as the mainstay of the Japanese economy for over 200 years, until the Shoguns were replaced in the Meiji Restoration in 1867.The obverse has the characters Kan Ei Tsu Ho, which translates as "Current Treasure of Kan-ei". Kan-ei refers to the era of the Shogunate that lasted from 1603 to 1644, however the inscription continued long after that era. In 1668 a new variety was introduced, with the Japanese character "bun" on the reverse, indicating the coin was made at the Edo (now Tokyo) mint. The Edo coins are of good quality and are well made. They continued to be issued until about 1700. It is a notable and inexpensive coins from an important period of Japanese history. Item JP-EDO


JAPAN 1 MON EDO (TOKYO) MINTMARK (1668-1700) C1.2 VF $3.00

source

Last edited by GHP; 08-13-2017 at 02:58 PM.
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